My Maternal German 11th. Great Grandfather, Johannes Linderman, Sr.

Bayern, Germany National Park

National Park, Bayern, Germany

Name: Rhene (Rhene)
Status: Place
Municipality name: Baddeckenstedt
Region name (Level 2): Landkreis Wolfenbuttel
Region name (Level 1): Lower Saxony
Country: Germany
Continent: Europe
Rhene is located in the region of Lower Saxony. Lower Saxony’s capital Hannover (Hannover) is approximately 45 km / 28 mi away from Rhene (as the crow flies). The distance from Rhene to Germany’s capital Berlin (Berlin) is approximately 224 km / 139 mi (as the crow flies).

source: Germany, Places in the World

Basisdaten
Bundesland: Bayern
Regierungsbezirk: Unterfranken
Landkreis: Rhön-Grabfeld
Höhe: 242 m ü. NHN
Fläche: 36,9 km2
Einwohner: 15.154 (31. Dez. 2015)
Bevölkerungsdichte: 411 Einwohner je km2
Postleitzahl: 97616
Vorwahl: 09771
Kfz-Kennzeichen: NES, KÖN, MET
Gemeindeschlüssel: 09 6 73 114
Stadtgliederung: 11 Ortsteile
Adresse der
Stadtverwaltung:
Rathausgasse 2
97616 Bad Neustadt a. d. Saale
Webpräsenz: www.bad-neustadt.de
Bürgermeister: Bruno Altrichter (FWG)
Lage der Stadt Bad Neustadt a.d.Saale im Landkreis Rhön-Grabfeld

source: Wikipedia

Germany Map
Married: 1524 in Schweinfurt Bayern Deutschland to Margarethe Sporerin
Schweinfurt is a city in the Lower Franconia region of Bavaria in Germany on the right bank of the navigable Main River, which is spanned by several bridges here, 27 km northeast of Würzburg. Wikipedia
Children: Anna, Salome, and Johannes, Jr. Lindemann
Schloss Werneck, Unterfranken, Bayern
Schloss Werneck, Unterfranken, Bayern
Death
Zwickau - Germany
The river Zwickauer Mulde in Zwickau, Germany

My Maternal 5th. Great Grandmother, Catherine (MacLean) Linderman

isle of bute, scotland

 Name Hew Mclean
Gender Male
Wife Margrat Campbell
Daughter Catharine Mclean
Other information in the record of
from Scotland Births and Baptisms
Name Catharine Mclean
Gender Female
Christening Date 02 Apr 1724
Christening Place JURA,ARGYLL,SCOTLAND
Father’s Name Hew Mclean
Mother’s Name Margrat Campbell
Citing this Record
“Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XYCL-M4R : 2 January 2015), Hew Mclean in entry for Catharine Mclean, 02 Apr 1724; citing JURA,ARGYLL,SCOTLAND, reference ; FHL microfilm 1,041,078

Rothesay
Town in Scotland
The town of Rothesay is the principal town on the Isle of Bute, in the council area of Argyll and Bute, Scotland. It can be reached by ferry from Wemyss Bay which offers an onward rail link to Glasgow. source: Wikipedia

Born: 1724 in Rothesay, Isle of Bute, Scotland.

Isle of Bute, Scotland Satellite

Isle of Bute, Scotland satellite picture

Christened: 2 April 1724 in Jura, Argyll, Scotland.

Daughter of Hugh (Hew) McLean and Margaret (Margrat) Campbell of Rothesay, Isle of Bute, Scotland.

The town of Rothesay Listeni/ˈrɒθ.si/ (Scottish Gaelic: Baile Bhòid) is the principal town on the Isle of Bute, in the council area of Argyll and Bute, Scotland. It can be reached by ferry from Wemyss Bay which offers an onward rail link to Glasgow. At the centre of the town is Rothesay Castle, a ruined castle which dates back to the 13th century, and which is unique in Scotland for its circular plan. Rothesay lies along the coast of the Firth of Clyde.

Catherine’s father, Hugh McLean was born in 1700 in Rothesay, Isle of Bute, Scotland. Catherine’s mother, Margaret Campbell born in Scotland.

Rothesay, Isle of Bute, Scotland

Rothesay, Bute, Scotland

Hugh Maclean and Margaret Campbell had seven children in Scotland:  Lachlane, Duncan, Catharine, Anne, Jane, John, and Elspeth McLean.

They emigrated from Scotland in 1749 to New York.

Ludlowville Falls in Lansing, New York

Ludlowville Falls, New York

Wife of Johann Jacob Linderman (aka Lindemann). Married 1743 in Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

Lancaster Junction Recreation Trail, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Lancaster Junction Recreation Trail, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Historic-Poole-Forge-Park-Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Historic-Poole-Forge-Park-Lancaster, Pennsylvania

They had fifteen children: Johann Justus, Elisabeth, Cornelius, Cornelia, Jacob, Peter, Johannes “John”, Henrik “Henry”, David, Sarah, Ezekiel, Peggy, Jenny, Mary “Polly”, and Catharine Linderman. All born in Montgomery, Orange County, New York. All were baptized in the Dutch Reformed Dutch Church, Montgomery, Orange, New York.

Main Street, Monygomery, Orange, New York

Main Street, Montgomery, Orange, New York

Old_Sugar_House_and_Middle_Dutch_Church_Montgomery, Orange, New York

Old_Sugar_House_and_Middle_Dutch_Church_Montgomery, Orange, New York

Family links:
Spouse:
Johann Jacob Linderman (1720 – 1792)

Children:
Ezekiel Linderman (1768 – 1848)

Justus Linderman (1743-1782)

Elizabeth “Bette” Linderman (Bentzel) (1754-1845)

Cornelius Linderman Sr. (1756-1848)

Cornelia Linderman (1756-    )

Peter Linderman (1757-1848)

Jacob Linderman Jr. (1760-    )

Heinrich “Henry” Linderman (1764-1844)

Sarah Linderman (Young) (1766-    )

Peggy Linderman

Jenny Linderman

Catherine Linderman (Martin) (1784-1862)

Death: Nov. 9, 1792

Montgomery
Orange County
New York, USA

Germantown Cemetery, NEW YORK

Burial:
Germantown Cemetery
Montgomery
Orange County
New York, USA

 Germantown Cemetery, NEW YORK2
Created by: Texas Tudors
Record added: Nov 23, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 101185441Germantown Cemetery, NEW YORK3

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=101185441

http://www.scotland-info.co.uk/bute.htm

My Mother, Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill

Family 001

LINDERMAN FAMILY REUNION, Bend, San Saba, Texas, October 1995. My cousins, Bill and Becky (Fey) Burgess’s ranch. Good times. Mother and Lou were still around. Mother and Daddy (Leroy Frederick) had six wonderful children. 

(back row) Brenda and Michelle Frederick, Joseph Frederick, Kristopher Hyden, Sally Brown, Fran and Karl Frederick,Phyllis and Danny Hyden

(second row) Phil and Tricia Harrod, Keli Vanderford, Sarah Moore, Daniel Hyden (third row) Joseph Frederick, Jean and Louis Mancill

(front row seated) Mathew Frederick, Alton Moore, Justin Vanderford, Jason Fallin, Johnathan Frederick, and Drew Vanderford

I always think of Mother on Mother’s Day, in fact all holidays. Mother always celebrated life. We had many a family get together over the years. I miss those days.

She left a long, legacy of love, she did not always have it so good. Mother survived the “The Great Depression”, hurricanes, and floods.

She raised six honest, law abiding, American Patriots. Mother honored her ancestors and a lot of the information that I have accumulated came from her records and verbal conversations over the years.

Mother taught us to have manners and be kind to all. She gave me the love for reading. Mother was born 7 December 1927 in Dubuque, Iowa. Mother had many talents. She knitted, crocheted, sewed, and did needlepoint. She taught me to sew in 1970, at the age of 16. Mother loved taking trips and celebrating life.  She taught us that God, Country, and Family were most important in life. We were taught that there was no shame in any kind of work.

2b197-705w-3rd-st-dubuque-ia-52001

E.F. Linderman Homeplace, at 705 W. Third Street, Dububuqe, Iowa still standing in 2012.

Great Grandpa Linderman watched every phase of their home being built in 1920. Several generations resided there over the years, from 1920-1968, then Great Aunt Gladys Nelson resided there until her retirement. She then sold it to move closer to her sister, Eppie Ayala, in Huntington Beach, California. Gladys shared the proceeds with all of her sister, and she and Eppie and Art Ayala traveled to Norway, the land of their ancestors.

Her parents, Harry and Phyl Linderman resided with his father, Edward and Gudrun Linderman during the Great Depression Era.  My grandparents made pies to survive. Grandpa Harry Linderman sold pies to help the family survive those hard years. They were blessed to own their home and to have family to help them. They tried to grow their food in their garden.

I visited that home at 705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa in 1970, and the house is not that big. Edward, Gladys, Shirley, and Roy Nelson, Jr. and Sr. resided there until  1930. Harry, Phyl, and four girls, Yvonne, Billie, Jean, and Patsy Linderman resided there until 1930. Mother survived the “Cold War”, the “Depression”, World War II, Hurricanes, Floods, Divorce, Death, and Disease.

The Great Depression lasted from 1929 to 1939, and was the worst economic downturn in the history of the industrialized world. It began after the stock market crash of October 1929, which sent Wall Street into a panic and wiped out millions of investors.” source: The Great Depression

young boys waiting for food in mission, dubuque, iowa, April 1940

Young boys waiting in kitchen of city mission for soup which is given out nightly. Dubuque, Iowa. April 1940. Photographer: John Vachon. For millions, soup kitchens offered the only food they would eat.
Source

14 Houses In Iowa From The 1930s And 40s Will Open Your Eyes To A Different Time

Children in Iowa eating their Christmas dinner of turnips and cabbage. From The 1930s And 40s Will Hopefully Open Your Eyes To A Different Time

Soup kitchens for millions in Dubuque, Iowa

Jean Marie (Linderman) Frederick Mancill and her six wonderful children!

Six Frederick children, 4-15-2011, Austin, TX

Sally Frederick Tudor I like to post this pic of mother and her six children around mother’s day. She is not here on earth but in heaven with Jesus. But…..she and my daddy left a strong legacy of love and hard working, good, Christian, and kind children. We carry on her legacy of love. We continue on mother, and look forward to seeing you again in heaven with Jesus.We are a loving and close-knit family. I want them to know how much I love them, as well as my wonderful brother and sister-laws. Our many birthdays, and holidays together have given me a lot of good memories. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. I want you all to see my post, so I am going to try and list them: Joseph & Brenda Meyers Frederick, Karl & Fran Frederick, Danny & Phyllis Frederick Hyden, Phil &Patricia Frederick Harrod, and Craig Moore & Sarah Moore.

CHRISTmas in Bavaria, Germany

BavariaSnowGermanyMy mother’s ancestors were from Obermochel, Pfalz, Bavaria, Germany. They emigrated in1740, and they helped found America. Mother loved the snow and Christmas. Mother you are so loved and missed. I am so grateful that I was blessed with such a wonderful mother, and He allowed me to keep you for 58 years of my life. You only had your mother for 36 years, but I am so grateful that you were able to share your memories of her with me. I was only 9 when she passed and I never got a chance to know her. Enjoy your time with your family in heaven. I hope to be with you and them again.

 Jean Marie (Linderman)Frederick Mancill

 

Birth: Dec. 3, 1927
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA
Death: Mar. 9, 2012
Rosharon
Brazoria County
Texas, USA 

Jean Marie (Linderman)Frederick Mancill, daughter of (Phylis at birth) Phyllis “Phyl” Eugenia(Palen) Linderman and Harry William Linderman. Her mother died when she was only 36 of Hodgekin’s Disease. She never really got over it, but just had to learn to live with it.Granddaughter of Frank Joseph Palen and Emma Elsie (Claussen) Palen, also of Edward Francis Linderman and Gudrun Ivara (Lund)Linderman of Dubuque, Iowa.First husband LeRoy “Lee” Eugene Frederick. Married 15 November 1947, Liberty, Texas. Divorced 1968. the Frederick homestead was at 1709 Cheston Drive, Jacinto City, Texas 77029.

Six children together: Joseph Lee, Phyllis Jean, Sally Ann, Karl Thomas, Patricia Marie, and Sarah Kay Frederick.
Mother was a very loving and creative woman. She taught me how to sew at 16, she made us a braided rug, she knitted, crocheted, needlepointed, and quilted.

Second husband Louis “Honey Lou” Clifford Mancill. Married 5 December 1968, Houston, Texas. The Mancill homestead was at 11039 Lafferty Oaks St, Houston, Texas.

My Mother and Dad made our house a home. We celebrated many a birthday, and all holidays at this home, at 11039 Lafferty Oaks St., in Houston, Texas.

He preceded her in death. No children of this union. One step son, Michieal Wayne Mancill, who was more like a brother. He was a part of our family.

She was the life of the party. She and my Dad loved music and dancing. Lou sang and played the guitar. She lived, she laughed and she loved. Lou called her his “satan pussycat”, and the “princess and the pea”. She was spoiled by my Dad. They spoiled each other. They were each other’s best friend. They were deeply in love.

Mother passed away at home surrounded with family that loved her. She just drifted off, and the angels came to get her. My consolation was she was not in pain, and not alone, and I was able to be there with her for her last six years of her life.

Mother just passed today, March 9, 2012, in Rosharon, Texas. She left us peacefully to be with Jesus. I am so grateful to have been able to spend the last six years living together with Mother. I am grateful that I was not working, so that I had the time to care for her. My sister, Phyllis and me took care of her at home just like she had wanted. We got to be even closer than ever.

She was blessed with a good life, and a good family. She really was always there with all of us six children, up until the last week of her life. She fell on Monday, and we think she had a mini stroke, she never was able to speak clearly after that. She passed away on Friday afternoon, in her sleep.

Mother left us just like she wanted to. She had dignity and respect from all who knew her. Everyone who knew her loved her. She was a very giving person, and always was there for her six children. Our family was a very loving, close-knit family.

Burial followed at the same Oaklawn Cemetery, where Aunt Yvonne Linderman (Levesque), Uncle Kenneth Jackson, and Aunt Yvarra “Billie” Linderman (Jackson) are buried.
Mother’s viewing was held on Monday, March 12, 2012 from 4-9pm. The funeral services were on Tuesday, March 13, 2012 @11am @ Oaklawn Cemetery Pavilion, on Hwy. 36 in Somerville, TX. location at:, Strickland Funeral Home at 545 8th Street, SOMERVILLE, TEXAS 77879, (979)596-2133.

Family links:
Parents:
Harry William Linderman (1903 – 1995)
Phyllis Eugenia Palen Linderman (1904 – 1963)

Spouses:
Leroy Eugene Frederick (1926 – 2006)
Louis Clifford Mancill (1924 – 2002)

Siblings:
Yvonne Phyllis Linderman Levesque (1924 – 2010)
Yvarra Irene Linderman Jackson (1925 – 1985)
Jean Marie Linderman Mancill (1927 – 2012)
Patricia Mae Linderman Cooke (1929 – 2000)

 

Burial:
Oaklawn Cemetery
Somerville
Burleson County
Texas, USA 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Mar 10, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 86532980

 

 
Jean Marie Jeanie <i>Linderman</i> Mancill Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
 
Jean Marie Jeanie <i>Linderman</i> Mancill Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

Jean Marie Jeanie <i>Linderman</i> Mancill.

Jean Marie (Linderman)Frederick and Leroy Eugene Frederick. Married 15 November 1947, Liberty, TX.

Jean Marie Linderman Frederick and Leroy Eugene Frederick, Married 15 November 1947, Liberty, TexasJean Marie Jeanie <i>Linderman</i> MancillJean Marie Jeanie <i>Linderman</i> Mancill

Jean Marie Jeanie <i>Linderman</i> Mancill

Linderman Homeplace~Wise Acres~Crosby, Harris County, Texas

Image

My maternal grandparents, Harry William Linderman and Phyllis Eugenia (Palen) married on 27 February 1923 in Clayton County, Iowa.

They resided in Dubuque, Dubuque, County, Iowa in 1930.

In 1935 they resided in Ottawa, La Salle County, Illinois.

They resided in Indianapolis, Hamilton County, Indiana in 1940.

Harry & Phyllis had four daughters together: Yvonne Phyllis, Yvarra Irene (Billie), Jean Marie, and Patricia (Patsy) Mae Linderman.

In 1943 the family moved to Houston, Harris County, Texas. 

My grandfather loved watching owls. He was always making wise cracks. 

So, they named their home place “Wiseacres” in Westfield, Hamilton County, Indiana.

They moved to Houston, Harris County, Texas in 1943. They also named their place there “Wiseacres” in Crosby, Harris County, Texas.

My mother was in the last year of high school and transferred from Indianapolis to Lamar High School.

Jean Linderman, Roy Nelson, Mike Jackson, 1945, Wiseacres (H.W. Harry & Phyllis Linderman's farm), Crosby, TX

Jean Linderman, Roy Nelson, Mike Jackson, and unknown friend, 1945, “Wiseacres” (“H.W.” Harry & Phyllis Linderman’s farm), Crosby, TX.

My Maternal Fourth Great Grandfather, Ezekiel Linderman, New York

Reformed Dutch Church of Shawangunk, in town o...
Reformed Dutch Church of Shawangunk, in town of same name, NY, USA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Reformed Protestant Church, Genesee Street, by...
Reformed Protestant Church, Genesee Street, by William E. James (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ezekiel Linderman

Birth: 1768
Montgomery
Orange County
New York, USA
Death: 1848
Ballston Lake
Saratoga County
New York, USA 

Son of Johann Jacob Linderman and Catherine (McLean) Linderman
First Spouse: Margaret Ridner/Redner/
Marriage: 28 March 1793
Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Shawangunk, Ulster, N.Y.
CHILDREN: child 1: unknown /Linderman/
gender: Female
birth 1811 (twin of Abraham)
Cayuta Twp., Tioga, New York
death 1811 child 

2: Abraham /Linderman/ [my third great grandfather]
gender: Male
birth 1811
Cayuta Twp., Tioga, New York
death 3 September 1891
Winona, Winona, Minnesota
moved 1837
St. Charles, Kane, Illinois

child 3: Catherine /Linderman/
gender: Female
birth 12 September 1799
Montgomery, Orange, New York
death 29 January 1882
Courtland, De Kalb, Illinois

child 4:Nancy /Linderman/
gender: Female
birth 9 July 1797
Montgomery, Orange, New York
death 2 February 1878
St. Charles, Kane, Illinois

child 5: John Redner /Linderman/
gender: Male
birth 15 January 1794, Orange, New York
baptism 22 June 1794, Hopewell Presbyterian Church, Crawford Twp., Orange, N.Y.
death September 1877, Oakland, Michigan
burial Sashabaw Cemetery, Sashabaw Plains Twp., Oakland, Mi.

child 6: Jacob /Linderman/
gender: Male
birth 12 December 1795
Montgomery Twp., Orange, New York, 

baptism 1796 German Reformed Church of Montgomery, Orange, N.Y.
death 12 April 1872, Gun Plains, Allegan, Michigan
moved, Cattaraugus, New York

child 7: Nicholas /Linderman/
gender: Male
birth 22 November 1803, Wallkill, Orange, New York
death 3 February 1887, Ischua, Cattaraugus, New York
burial Fitch Cemetery, Ischua, Cattaraugus, N.Y.

Submission date: 12 Oct 2012
submission id: MMCZ-6DY
Notes:
Seen as a Ridner in marriage record, then as a Redner in record of son John’s birth.

Second spouse:
Mary Ann Miller born: England
married 19 march 1839
Kane County, Illinois

Sources:
1820 U.S. Census
1830 U.S. Census
1800 U.S. Census
1825 State Census
1810 U.S. Census    

Also U.S./Can. Book, 1850 U.S. Census
Orange County Genealogical Society, Hopewell Presbyterian Church Records (Goshen, N.Y.:), Compiled by; Mrs Jean D. Worden, Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Shawangunk, Ulster, New York (Goshen, N.Y.: , cir.1940)
Compiled by ; Helen F. Lewis, New York’s Finger Lakes Pioneer Families (Rhinebeck, New York : Kinship, c.1980’s) Source Citation
“Pedigree Resource File,” database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/393B-LZ8 : accessed 28 October 2012), entry for Margaret /Redner/.

Over time the name was shortened to Ballston. Early settlers in this area feared attacks from Mohawks, who already inhabited the region and who resented the establishment of European buildings on their sacred grounds. One of Ballston’s historic sites is Indian Rock, a large boulder where Mohawk tribesmen reputedly took white captives (children, in some cases) to torture and kill them.
Ballston Lake, BALLSTON, NEW YORK: The region was first settled around 1763. In 1775, the area became a District in Albany County.
In 1780, British forces attacked the northern part of the town and took captives back to Canada. The area was originally called “Ball’s Town” and “Ballton.” The town was formed in 1785 while still in Albany County. The original owners of the town were the McDonald brothers. Eliphalet Ball bought the area of land from them and called it Ball’s Town. Ball also paid the brothers 1 barrel of rum for the e, a narrow, 3.7-mile (6.0 km)-long lake with a maximum depth of 120 feet (37 m) in the south of the region, was called “Shanantaha” by natives. It was known to early white settlers as Long Lake. The lake was part of the Mohawk River during the glacial age and archaeological digs have unearthed artifacts indicating settlement around the lake as early as 3,500 BCE. For a long time the depth of Ballston Lake was not determined, due to the multiple caves that prevented divers from going to the bottom. There has been an artifact found that is dated 2000 B.C. It is also believed that a lake monster exists within one of the hundreds of caves. That is called by the natives Big Tim and has been spotted by multiple people.  Wikipedia

Family links:
Parents:
Johann Jacob Linderman (1720 – 1792)
Catherine Mc Lean Linderman (1728 – 1792)

Spouse:
Margarette Redner Linderman (1764 – 1839)

Children:
Jacob Linderman (1796 – 1872)
Abraham Linderman (1811 – 1891)
 
Burial:
Unknown
 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Oct 29, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 99856384

 

English: Verbeck House, Ballston Spa, NY, USA
English: Verbeck House, Ballston Spa, NY, USA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

My Mother the Matriarch of our Family, Jean Marie (Linderman) Frederick Mancill

Birth: Dec. 3, 1927
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA

Death: Mar. 9, 2012
Rosharon
Brazoria County
Texas, USA
JEAN MARIE LINDERMAN FREDERICK MANCILLMOTHER'S HEADSTONE-SOMERVILLE, TXPhyllis and mother's headstone, Somerville, TXJean Marie (Linderman)Frederick Mancill, daughter of Phyllis “Phyl” Eugenia (Palen) Linderman and Harry William Linderman.

jean-marie-linderman-1943-Lamar High School - Houston, TX
Granddaughter of Frank Joseph Palen and Emma Elsie (Claussen) Palen, also of Edward Francis Linderman and Gudrun Ivarra (Lund)Linderman of Dubuque, Iowa.
First huband LeRoy Eugene Frederick. Married 15 November 1947, Liberty, Texas. Divorced 1968. the Frederick homestead was at 1709 Cheston Drive, Jacinto City, Texas 77029.

4b8b3-scannedimage-2

Six children together: Joseph Lee, Phyllis Jean, Sally Ann, Karl Thomas, Patricia Marie, and Sarah Kay Frederick.Mother was a very loving and creative woman. She taught me how to sew at 16, she made us a braided rug, she knitted, crocheted, needlepointed, and quilted.

Second husband Louis “Honey Lou” Clifford Mancill. Married 5 December 1968, Houston, Texas. Our Mancill homestead was at 11039 Lafferty Oaks St, Houston, Texas. My Mother and Dad made our house a home. We celebrated many a birthday, and all holidays at this home, at 11039 Lafferty Oaks St., in Houston, Texas.

d8281-louis26jeanmancill

He preceded her in death. No children of this union. One step son, Michieal Wayne Mancill. She was the life of the party. My Dad sang and played the guitar for her. She lived, she laughed and she loved. Lou called her his “satan pussycat”, and the “princess and the pea”. She was spoiled by my Dad. They spoiled each other. They were each other’s best friend. They were deeply in love.

Mother passed away at home surrounded with family that loved her. She just drifted off, and the angels came to get her. We believe that the week before, she had some mini strokes, because after that she could not speak and was bed ridden. My consolation was she was not in pain, and not alone, and I was able to be there with her for her last six years of her life.

Mother just passed today, Friday, March 9, 2012, in Rosharon, Texas. She left us peacefully to be with Jesus. I am so grateful to have been able to spend the last six years living together with Mother. We got to be even closer than ever.

She was blessed with a good life, and a good family. She really was always there with all of us six children, up until the last week of her life. She fell on Monday, and we think she had a mini stroke, she never was able to speak clearly after that. She passed away on Friday afternoon, in her sleep.

Mother told us that she did not want to go, but she left us just like she wanted to. She had dignity and respect from all who knew her. Everyone who knew her loved her. She was a very giving person, and always was there for her six children.Our family was a very loving, close-knit family.

Burial followed at the same Oaklawn Cemetery, where Aunt Yvonne Linderman (Levesque), Uncle Kenneth Jackson, and Aunt Yvarra “Billie” Linderman (Jackson) are buried.

Mother’s viewing was held on Monday, March 12, 2012 from 4-9pm. The funeral services were on Tuesday, March 13, 2012 @11am @ Oaklawn Cemetery Pavilion, on Hwy. 36 in Somerville, TX. location at:, Strickland Funeral Home at 545 8th Street, SOMERVILLE, TEXAS 77879, (979)596-2133.

Family links:
Parents:
Harry William Linderman (1903 – 1995)
Phyllis Eugenia Palen Linderman (1904 – 1963)

Spouses:
Leroy Eugene Frederick (1926 – 2006)
Louis Clifford Mancill (1924 – 2002)
Burial:
Oaklawn Cemetery
Somerville
Burleson County
Texas, USA

Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Mar 10, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 86532980

This is my favorite pic of all six of us with Mother, when she was still feeling well enough to travel. (left to right & back to front) Sally Tudor, Phyllis Hyden, Joseph Frederick, Karl Frederick, Jean Mancill (in pink), Sarah Moore, & Patricia Harrod.Mother’s six children: Sally Ann(Frederick)Tudor, Phyllis Jean(Frederick)Hyden, Joseph Lee “Joe” Frederick, Karl Thomas Frederick, Jean Marie (Linderman) Frederick Mancill, Sarah (Frederick)Moore, and Patricia (Frederick)Vanderford Harrod, April 15, 2011, Austin, Texas @ Justin & Allison Vanderford’s wedding. This is one of my favorite pics of us and mother. It was one of the last trips that she took with me. She loved to go “bye-bye”. –:) 

Six Frederick children, 4-15-2011, Austin, TX
Jean Linderman, Roy Nelson, & Michael Jackson, unknown friend, 1945, Crosby, Texas.

Jean Linderman, Roy Nelson, Mike Jackson, 1945, Wiseacres (H.W. Harry & Phyllis Linderman's farm), Crosby, TX

Leroy & Jean (Linderman)Frederick, married November 15, 1947, Liberty, Texas

4102 Arnold St., Houston, TX

Related articles

Linderman Family Genealogy~Dubuque, Iowa (texastudors.wordpress.com)
My Maternal Grandfather, Harry William Linderman, German & Norwegian Ancestor (lindermangenealogy.wordpress.com)
Edward Francis Linderman~My Maternal Great Grandfather~German Ancestor (lindermangenealogy.wordpress.com)
My Third Great Maternal Grandmother~~Maria A. “Mary” (Hammell) Linderman (hammellgenealogy.wordpress.com)

E.F. Linderman Homeplace-705 W. Third Street- Dubuque, Iowa

Texas Tudors' Blog

705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa 52001

Home built by E. F. Linderman & Gudrun Ivara (Lund) Linderman

Edward Francis Linderman, 705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa

Shirley, Jimmie, Dickie, Gladys, and Edward Linderman~World War II~Dubuque, Iowa

Written by Roy Leonard “Jimmie” Nelson, Jr.

“Winter school work done in dining room next to coal burning pot belly stove. Heavy drapes to close living room off. House heated by registers, water circulated by furnace in basement. Coal storage room in basement to be hand fed to furnace. Sometime during W.W. II Grandpa had the furnace converted to oil fed. In the basement there was a vegetable room for canned foods, sacks of potatoes, and bags of sugar, etc…

There was a double sink to wash clothes, and one sink had a wringer. There was a four burner stove to heat copper boiler for washing clothes (hot water). Basement foundation large stones. They were white washed every…

View original post 528 more words

Edward Francis Linderman~My Maternal Great Grandfather~German Ancestor

Dubuque, Iowa, Wagon Bridge, Mississippi River...

Old Cable elevatorFamily Vacation in Dubuque, Iowa | Road Trips For FamiliesDubuque Iowa, Incline Railway    Yes, we always ride it up and down when we visit Dubuque Iowa!

Edward Francis “Edy” Linderman
 
Birth: Feb. 9, 1875
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Death: Jun. 26, 1968
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA

Only grandson of Abraham & Mary (Holman) Linderman of Winona, Minnesota. Only child of Mary Linderman. Father unknown.
E. F. Linderman worked and lived on the Mississippi River all his life. He worked for the U.S. Lock & Dam in LaCrosse, Wisconsin; and Dubuque, Iowa.
Married Gudrun Ivarra Lund from Norway on 11 September 1902 in Winona, Minnesota. Edward & Gudrun had one son, Harry; and three daughters, Gladys Serene, Irene Mary, and Evelyn Frances Linderman. They all resided at 705 W. Third St., Dubuque, Iowa.
Great Grandpa was in the I.O.O.F. in Dubuque, Iowa. He converted to Jehovah’s Witness after the death of his beloved wife, Gud. The children were raised as Lutheran and all baptized as Lutheran in the St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church, at 2025 Jackson Street, in Dubuque, Iowa.
Edy was cremated and his ashes were scattered in the same cemetery as Gud, up on the hill, because the government told his family, that they couldn’t scatter his ashes in the Mississippi River where he wanted to be. They said that it would pollute the river.Family links:
Parents:
Mary Linderman (1859 – 1924)Spouse:
Gudrun Ivarra Lund Linderman (1881 – 1924)Children:
Harry William Linderman (1903 – 1995)*
Gladys Serena Linderman Nelson (1906 – 1996)*
Irene Mary Linderman Wiedner (1908 – 1997)*
Evelyn Frances Linderman Ayala (1913 – 1997)*
 
Burial:
Linwood Cemetery
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069314
Edward Francis Edy Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS

My Maternal Fifth Great German Grandfather, Johann Jacob Linderman, Obermoschel, Pfalz, Bavaria, Germany

Coat of arms of Obermoschel
Coat of arms of Obermoschel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Wappen verb alsenz obermoschel
Wappen verb alsenz obermoschel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Obermoschel, GermanyObermoschel, Donnersbergkreis, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

Obermoschel is a town in the district Donnersbergkreis, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. It is part of the Verbandsgemeinde Alsenz-Obermoschel. It is situated 15 km southwest of Bad Kreuznach. Wikipedia

Obermoschel2, GermanyObermoschel, Germany

LIST OF FOREIGNERS IMPORTED IN THE SHIP “LOYAL JUDITH”, LOVELL PAINTER, COMMANDER, FROM ROTTERDAM, AMSTERDAM, [THE NETHERLANDS]. QUALIFIED 25 NOVEMBER 1740. OATH OF ALLEGIANCE SHOWS JACOB AS AGE 18. Wood carving2, GermanyWood carving, Germany

Johann Jacob Linderman 
 
Birth:  Nov. 20, 1720
Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
Death:  Dec. 26, 1792
Montgomery
Orange County
New York, USA

Johann Jacob Linderman, born 20 November 1720 in Obermoschel, Pfalz, Bavaria, Germany.Christened: on 20 November 1720 in Obermoschel, Pfalz, Bavaria, Germany.

Emigrated on 25 August 1740 from Zweibrucken, Rhineland-Palatinate, Schwarzbach, Germany to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Arrived on 25 November 1740.

Resided in Germantown Township, Philadelphia Co, Pennsylvania in December 1740. 

Died on 26 December 1792 in Montgomery, Orange Co, New York.

Son of Johann Justus Linderman and Anna Elizabeth Imbsweiler.

Married: Catharine McLean in 1743 in Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

They had twelve children: Justus, Elisabeth, Cornelius, Cornelia, Jacob, Peter, Henrik “Henry”, Sarah, Ezekiel, Peggy, Jenny, and Catharine Linderman. All born in Montgomery, Orange County, New York.

JOHANN JACOB LINDERMAN SERVED IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR BETWEEN 1775-1781. HE WAS IN THE COLONIAL PENNSYLVANIA ARMY.

Family links: 
 Parents:
  Johann Justus Linderman (1690 – 1769)
 
 Spouse:
  Catherine Mc Lean Linderman (1728 – 1792)*
 
 Children:
  Ezekiel Linderman (1768 – 1848)*
 

 
Burial: 
Unknown
Specifically: Burial site unknown
 

 
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Nov 23, 2012 
Find A Grave Memorial# 101180416

My Maternal Grandfather, Harry William Linderman, German & Norwegian Ancestor

My mother, Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill, daughter of Harry William Linderman, 1980 @ Cellar Door Restaurant, Houston, Texas.

 

Harry William “Billy” Linderman

Birth: Jun. 13, 1903
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Death: Apr. 10, 1995
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA

Great Grandson of Abraham & Mary (Hammell) Linderman of Winona, Minnesota.Grandson of Mary Linderman.
Son of Edward Francis Linderman & Gudrun (Lund) Linderman. Baptized as Lutheran on September 7, 1903, in Winona, Minnesota.
Raised at 705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa. Played the violin, organ, and piano. Graduated from Dubuque High School. Attended Ames College.
Grandpa was a suave, debonaire gentleman. He was a true salesman.
Married Phylis Adele Palen of Winona, Minnesota on 27 February 1923 in Clayton County, Iowa. They met in High School, and were very much in love. They eloped. Harry & Phyl moved from Iowa, to Indiana, and then Crosby, Texas.
Moved his family to Houston, Harris County, Texas in 1945.He and Phyl ran and owned “Saturday’s Tavern” in Gayhill, Texas in the 1950’s. They owned Linbar, Inc. in Houston, Harris County, Texas.Elected January 1954 Harris County Republican Chairman. Phyl and Harry resided at 4002 Arnold St., Houston, Texas, and were quite the gracious hosts.Harry & Phyl had four daughters; Yvonne Phyllis, Yvarra (Billie) Irene, Jean Marie, and Patricia (Patsy) Mae Linderman, and no sons.Grandpa Harry grieved the loss of my Grandmother in 1963, when she died of Hodgekin’s Disease. He went bankrupt and had to sell off the family business and home to pay his wife’s medical bills.
Harry remarried in 1966 to Martha Burden Preston Johnston. They resided at 2727 Drexel Dr., Houston, Texas as husband and wife in 1995 when Grandpa Harry passed away.He was the family historian and photographer. I guess you could say that I came by it rightfully.–:)Family links:
Parents:
Edward Francis Linderman (1875 – 1968)
Gudrun Ivarra Lund Linderman (1881 – 1924)Spouse:
Phyllis Eugenia Palen Linderman (1904 – 1963)Children:
Yvonne Phyllis Linderman Levesque (1924 – 2010)*
Yvarra Irene Linderman Jackson (1925 – 1985)*
Jean Marie Linderman Mancill (1927 – 2012)*
Patricia Mae Linderman Cooke (1929 – 2000)*
Burial:
Forest Park Westheimer Cemetery
Houston
Harris County
Texas, USA
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069606
Harry William Billie Linderman
Added by: TEXAS TUDORS
Harry William Billie Linderman

HARRY WAS RAISED LUTHERAN. HE WAS THE ONLY SON OF EDWARD & GUDRUN LINDERMAN. HIS FATHER NICKNAMED HIM “BILLIE”, AND HIS MOTHER CALLED HIS FATHER” EDY”. EDWARD CALLED GUDRUN “GUD”. HE HAD THREE SISTERS, GLADYS, IRENE, AND EVELYN LINDERMAN. HARRY LINDERMAN WAS THE GRANDSON OF MARY LINDERMAN OF WINONA, MINNESOTA, GREAT-GRANDSON OF ABRAHAM & MARY LINDERMAN OF WINONA, MINNESOTA AND CRAWFORD, NEW YORK. HARRY WAS SUAVE, DEBONAIRE, WELL-MANNERED GENTLEMAN. HARRY MARRIED PHYLIS ADELE PALEN. HE WAS RAISED AT 705 WEST THIRD ST, DUBUQUE,DUBUQUE CO, IOWA. THE LINDERMAN CHILDREN WERE RAISED LUTHERAN. HE ATTENDED LINCOLN SCHOOL, DUBUQUE,IOWA FROM SEPT. 1909- JUNE 1915. GRANDPA’S GRADES WERE ALL A’S. HARRY GRADUATED FROM DUBUQUE HIGH SCHOOL IN JUNE 1921. HE WAS A VERY INTELLIGENT,WELL MANNERED GENTLEMAN. HARRY WAS A SUAVE, DEBONAIRE GENTLEMEN. HARRY WORKED AS DISTRICT SALESMAN,AND THEN SALES MANAGER IN THE REFRACTORY [FIRE BRICK] DEPARTMENT, AT HOUSTON BUILDER’S SUPPLY, AT 119 NORTH HAMILTON, HOUSTON, TEXAS. THEN, HARRY AND PHYLIS PALEN LINDERMAN, STARTED THEIR OWN BUSINESS IN HOUSTON,TEXAS, CALLED “LINBAR INC,” IN 1952, AND RAN IT UP UNTIL 1970. IT WAS INSTALLING FURNACES. HE WORKED FOR “FLEXIBLE WALLS,INC.” FROM 1970-1972. “DRYWALL INC.” FROM 1972-1977, AND “EAVES CONSTRUCTION, INC.” FROM 1977-1982. HARRY RETIRED FROM HIS BOOKKEEPING POSITION WITH “EAVES CONSTRUCTION, INC. AT THE AGE OF 80 IN 1982. HARRY & PHYL BOUGHT A HOME AT 4002 ARNOLD IN WEST UNIVERSITY PLACE, HOUSTON,TEXAS. THEY ALSO BUILT A SUMMER PLACE, AND A TAVERN IN GAYHILL, BURLESON CO, TEXAS. THE TAVERN WAS NAMED “SATURDAY’S TAVERN”. HARRY RAN THE BAR, PHYL PLAYED THE PIANO, AND AUNT PATSY LINDERMAN COOKE & UNCLE KENNETH JACKSON SANG IN THE TAVERN. OUR FAMILY LOVED THE “NIGHT LIFE”. GRANDPA WAS THE FAMILY BARBEQUER, AND HE BUILT A HUGE, BRICK BARBEQUE PIT. HARRY & PHYL LINDERMAN, JEAN & LEROY FREDERICK, PATSY & JAY COOKE, AND BILLIE & KEN JACKSON SPENT MANY A SUMMER WEEKEND TOGETHER IN THE COUNTRY. HARRY WILLIAM LINDERMAN WAS THE CHAIRMAN OF THE REPUBLICAN PARTY OF HARRIS COUNTY IN 1954. HARRY SOLD THE FAMILY HOME AT 4002 ARNOLD TO HELP PAY FOR PHYL’S MEDICAL BILLS. PHYLIS PALEN LINDERMAN DIED OF HODGEKIN’S DISEASE ON 27 DEC. 1963, IN HOUSTON, HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS.
HARRY’S SECOND WIFE WAS MARTHA BURDEN JOHNSTON. THEY MARRIED IN RICHMOND,FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS ON JULY 13, 1966. HARRY AND MATTYE RESIDED AT 2727 DREXEL DRIVE, HOUSTON,TEXAS FROM 1966 TO 1995. THEY WERE MARRIED FOR TWENTY EIGHT YEARS. GRANDPA HARRY WAS THE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHER, AND HISTORIAN. BETWEEN 1950 AND1960 GRANDPA TOOK ROLLS AND ROLLS OF 8mm. MOVIE FILM OF OUR FAMILY. MOST OF THE ROLLS WERE DESTROYED IN THE FLOOD FROM TROPICAL STORM ALLISON ON 8 JUNE 2001, AT 11039 LAFFERTY OAKS STREET, HOUSTON, TEXAS. GRANDPA-HARRY WILLIAM & GRANDMA-PHYL ADELE PALEN LINDERMAN WERE ALWAYS THE GRACIOUS HOSTS. THEY WERE LOVED BY ALL. HARRY’S FATHER WAS GERMAN, AND HIS MOTHER WAS NORWEGIAN. HARRY’S WORD WAS HIS BOND. HE WAS HONEST,HARD-WORKING, AND RESPONSIBLE. HE LOVED HIS FAMILY! THIS LINDERMAN DESCENDANT IS VERY PROUD OF HIM.
written by Sally Ann Frederick Fallin Brown Tudor

ALL Of My Ancestors Have Fought and Died To Save America From Communism!

Image result for tyranny pictures

Related imageImage result for tyranny pictures

ALL Of My Ancestors Have Fought and Died To Save America FROM Communism! They Emigrated From Europe To Escape Socialism and Communism, for Freedom of Religion, and To Have A Better Life! They all came her legally, learned English, assimilated into American society, and pledged allegiance to the United States of America.

NONE of them Froze, and Bled, and Died to allow America’s Liberties and Freedoms to be REMOVED by the Demon-Rats, Socialists, and Communists! Our White House and our Congress have been INVADED by them. The “Enemy Within” is working for the Devil NOT God

My Fifth Great Maternal Grandfather, Johann Jacob Linderman, emigrated in 1740 to Pennsylvania and he helped to build these “United States of America”. He was in the Pennsylvania Colonial Army. He worked for everything that he got for our family. I am proud to be one of his descendants.

I will do whatever I am able to do~ to help save our beloved America from the “Enemy Within”, the Socialist=Demon-Rats=Communists trying to destroy the United States of America! We will not submit to their tyranny and we will not give up our guns or our “right to defend ourselves and our families and friends” from the evil ones.

Anyone who wants Communism needs to get the hell out of America, and go to a Communist country! There are plenty of them! Stop coming from your third world “shit-holes”, and trying to change our beloved country into the “hell-hole” you crawled out of! God bless America. God save America from the “Evil Within”!!

United States of America
United States of America (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

German Chocolate Crazy Cake~~My Favorite German Dessert

German Chocolate Crazy Cake
               

German Chocolate Crazy Cake

 1 box Betty Crocker® SuperMoist® German chocolate cake mix Water, vegetable oil and eggs called for on cake mix box
Filling and Topping
1 1/2 cups sugar
3/4 cup butter
1 can (12 oz) evaporated milk
egg yolks
1 package (7 oz) flaked coconut (2 2/3 cups)
2 cups chopped pecans
3 teaspoons vanilla

1/2 cup Betty Crocker® Rich & Creamy chocolate frosting (from 1-lb container

1 Heat oven to 350°F. Grease bottoms only of 2 (9-inch) round cake pans with shortening.  Make and bake cake mix as directed on box for 9-inch round pans, using water, oil and eggs. Cool 10  minutes. Remove from pans to cooling racks. Cool completely.

2 In 3-quart heavy saucepan, mix sugar, butter, milk and egg yolks. Heat to simmering over medium heat, stirring frequently. Cook 9 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until thickened. Remove from heat. Stir in coconut, pecans and vanilla. Cool completely, about 1 hour.

3 Cut each cake layer horizontally into 2 layers. On serving plate, place 1 layer, cut side up. Spread with about 1 1/3 cups filling. Repeat with second and third layers and 2 2/3 cups filling.

4 With serrated knife, cut remaining cake layer into 1 1/2-inch-wide strips. Cut strips into irregular pieces. Place cake pieces randomly over filling to cover top of cake, pressing gently into cake and fitting snugly together. Refrigerate cake several hours before serving, if desired.

5 In small microwavable bowl, microwave frosting 10 seconds on High until thin enough to drizzle. Drizzle over top of cake. Store covered in refrigerator.

My favorite cake is German Chocolate, and I am going to make one for my own birthday. I turn 59 next week. Mother always made my birthday cake except for the last couple years. She went to be with Jesus on March 9, 2012. She always made Chocolate Cake with Coffee frosting (homemade by her). I never cared for or drank coffee, but I loved her coffee frosting. We Germans love our chocolate! My Grandfather loved his chocolate! He ate Chocolate Ice Cream and Chocolate Syrup with Pecans every night up until he died.  

I know that life must go on. I have been telling my son that, he is 30. Mother was 84 and she lived a good life. She passed peacefully in her sleep. I am grateful for that. So, I am starting my own tradition this year. 

German chocolate cake from a bakery
German chocolate cake from a bakery (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Betty Crocker logo used until 2003
Betty Crocker logo used until 2003 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bavarian Alps, Pfalz, Bavaria, Germany

Christmas in the Bavarian Alps, GermanyBlue Christmas in the Snow

Christmas in Bavarian Alps. Bavaria , formally the Free State of Bavaria , is a state of Germany , located in the southeast of Germany. With an area of, it is the largest state by area, forming almost 20% of the total land area of Germany. Bavaria is Germany’s second most populous state (after North Rhine-Westphalia ), with 12.5 million inhabitants, more than any of the three sovereign nations on its borders. Bavaria’s capital and largest city is Munich , the third largest city in Germany.

One of the oldest states of Europe, it was established as a duchy in the mid first millennium . In the 17th century, the Duke of Bavaria became a Prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire . The Kingdom of Bavaria existed from 1806 to 1918, and Bavaria has since been a free state (republic ). Modern Bavaria thus includes parts of the historical regions of Franconia and Swabia) .

Germany~Culture, Cuisine, and Places of Germany

Germany

More PowerPoint presentations from Anurag

I did not know that the National Tree of Germany is the Oak Tree. Mother loved the Oak Tree. I have always loved nature, and trees. I  have done the Family Trees for our family. I love history and family genealogy.

oak tree in the summer
oak tree in the summer (Photo credit: Tom-Riddle)

Beauty Of Germany~My German Ancestors

Several of my ancestors emigrated from different parts of Germany. My Claussen, Kobel, Rabe, Koch, Linderman, and Frederick? also ( I believe that my paternal grandfather, Karel Fredrich, was born out of wedlock and maybe his father was Bohemian or German). 
His naturalization papers stated that he was born in Mala Lehota, Moravia. Malá Lehota is a village and municipality in the Žarnovica District, Banská Bystrica Region in Slovakia, in Southern Moravia. We will never know for sure. He took that secret to his grave. In that day and time the worst thing that you could be is German or illegitimate). (I believe that his mother was single. My daddy told me that his father, Karel was as dark as you could get, without being black, and that he believed that he was Bohemian. My paternal grandmother, said that Bohemians were like gypsies and roamed around and Moravians looked down on Bohemians).

Europe in 1740~~The Year The Lindermans Emigrated to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Archduchess Maria Josefa (LOC)
Archduchess Maria Josefa (LOC) (Photo credit: The Library of Congress)
Empress Maria Theresia of Austria
Empress Maria Theresia of Austria (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Family of Ludwig III of Bavaria. King Ludwig I...
Family of Ludwig III of Bavaria. King Ludwig III, his consort Maria Theresia and their son crown prince Rupprecht. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: Archduchess Maria Anna of Austria, Pr...
English: Archduchess Maria Anna of Austria, Princess of Lorraine, second daughter of Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI. of Austria and Princess Elisabeth Christine of Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel, sister of Empress Maria Theresia of Austria, wife of Prince Charles Alexandre of Lorraine, 18th century (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: Duchess MAria Theresia of Wuerttmbger...
English: Duchess MAria Theresia of Wuerttmbger nee Archduchess of Austria Deutsch: Herzogin Maria Theresia von WÜrttemberg geb. Erzherzogin von Österreich (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI with his wife Em...
Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI with his wife Empress Elisabeth Christine and their three daughters, Archduchesses (L-R) Maria Amalia, Maria Theresia and Maria Anna (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Palace of Schönbrunn
Palace of Schönbrunn (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Deutsch: Maria Theresia mit Maske, Ölgemälde v...
Deutsch: Maria Theresia mit Maske, Ölgemälde von Martin van Meytens (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

europe_1740

Important Historical Events between 1700 and 1792

This historical survey is meant to help the reader with eventual difficulties in understanding peculiarities in the texts offered in the decade 1782 to 1792. Most of the data were taken from W. Stein: Kulturfahrplan. Die wichtigsten Daten der Kulturgeschichte von Anbeginn bis 1795. F. A. Herbig Verlagsbuchhandlung, München-Berlin-Wien, 1976. The symbols * and  \ mean birth respectively death.

1740 Charles VI, Roman-German Emperor since 1711 and King of Hungaria (* 1685).
Charles VII Albrecht of Bavaria becomes Roman-German Emperor ( 1745).
Maria Theresia becomes Queen of Hungaria and Archduchess of Austria ( 1780).
 Frederick William I (“King of Soldiers”????), King of Prussia since 1713 (* 1688).
Frederick II (“the Great”) becomes King of Prussia ( 1786); sovereign of the “enlightened absolutism“, adherent to French culture; he reforms administration, administration of justice????, social order, and economy; abolishes torture etc.; begins the “First Silesian War” (until 1742) against Maria Theresia.

My Fourth Great Granduncle~Pvt. Cornelius Linderman~New York Militia

My Fourth Great Granduncle~Pvt. Cornelius Linderman~served in the New York Militia from 19 April 1775 to 1783 during the American Revolutionary War.

Pvt. Cornelius Linderman
Birth: Mar. 29, 1756
Wallkill,
Ulster County
New York, USA
Death: Feb. 8, 1848
Ithaca
Tompkins County
New York, USA

Son of Pvt. Johann Jacob Linderman and Catharina (McLean) Linderman.Husband of Antje “Anna” Jung (Young) Linderman.

Father of Isaac, Ezekial, Elshe, Jacob, Cornelius, William, Henry, John, Elsie, Anna, Alche, Elizabeth, Nancy, Jane, Mary and Catherine.

Veteran of the American Revolutionary War
DAR Patriot Ancestor# A070545.
Ulster County Militia, 4th Regiment.
Dutchess County Militia, 6th Regiment.
(1)Capts Graham, Millspaw, Barclay, Mole.
(2)Cols Hasbrouck, Paulding & McLaugherty.

Died age 91 years, 10 months & 9 days

Family links:

Spouse:
Anna Young Linderman (1759 – 1841)

also spelled as Antje Jung

 
Burial:
Ithaca City Cemetery
Ithaca
Tompkins County
New York, USA
Plot: ws-b-86-1
 
Maintained by: ladymayflowerCreated by: sjs953
Record added: Jan 07, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 46434820
Cornelius Linderman
Added by: John & Dolores Chase
 
Cornelius Linderman
Added by: sjs953
 
Cornelius Linderman
Added by: sjs953
 

 

Minolta DSC

new-york-militia

Bodine’s Bridge, Montgomery, Orange County, New York.

Bodine's Bridge, Montgomery, Orange County, New York.

Bodine’s Bridge carries NY 211 across the Wallkill River, a mile (1.6 km) south (west by the highway’s signed direction) of the village of Montgomery, New York, USA, near Orange County Airport. At 340 feet (103 m) in length, the steel through truss is the longest bridge along Route 211. The current bridge was built in 1933, and reconstructed in 1970.

My maternal fifth great grandparents moved in 1790 to Montgomery, New York from Germantown, Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania German~~~Christmas Traditions

Nederlands: Sinterklaas tijdens het Het Feest ...

Pennsylvania German Christmas Traditions

The mosaic of ethnic backgrounds present in Amish Country have resulted in a rich tapestry of Old and New World Christmas customs. Many of the most interesting traditions are unique to our Pennsylvania German heritage.

Candles

Candles, of course, have always been a part of Christmas celebrations. In Old World Germany, Martin Luther is credited as being the first person to put candles on a tree, “to represent the glory and beauty of the stars above Bethlehem.” In Ireland, the old custom was to “leave a candle burning in the window to light the way for the Christ Child on Christmas Eve.” It is interesting to note the old tradition in Europe of “illumination,” whereby the birthday of a prince was celebrated by putting candles in the windows.

In the Windows

Visitors to Amish Country notice that we often have candles in our windows all year, not just during the holiday season. The year-round practice apparently started several years ago when a local tourist home left its Christmas candles in the windows as a sign of welcome. The idea seemed to catch on, as people found it attractive, especially in older homes. So now this nostalgic, warm look can be enjoyed by Lancastrians and visitors at any time of the year.

The Star

The Moravian religious community that settled in Lititz has preserved for us two particularly unique Christmas customs, the Moravian Star and the Christmas Putz.

The beautiful 26-point Moravian Star has long been identified with Advent and Christmas. The star originated in the Moravian school handcraft sessions in Niesky, Germany, in the mid-1800’s. The simple 26-point version is quite common, seen hanging and lighted at night on porches in Lititz. Many people are surprised to learn that the first Moravian Star was red and white, not the lovely soft white color usually seen today.

The Moravian Church in Lititz may be the only place in America where you can see a spectacular 110-point star. While the 110-point star is rarely seen here, the design was obtained from Germany, reproduced in Lititz, and first hung in the church in 1980.

The “Putz”

Nativity scenes are popular at Christmas, and the “putz” is the Pennsylvania Dutch interpretation of the crèche. Related to the old medieval mystery plays, the putz may have originated to help children better appreciate the Christmas story. The word “putz” is from the German “putzen” for “to decorate, especially to adorn a church.”

Originally, the putz consisted of wooden, clay, or tin figures arranged to depict the Nativity. There were other groupings displayed besides the Nativity scene, such as the Holy Family, the Annunciation, the shepherds in the hills, the three kings, and the flight to Egypt.

Today the making of the putz can be a family project. Decisions must be made on the background, which may involve live plants and paper painted to simulate rocks. There may be stars in the sky and angels suspended with black thread. The middle and foreground include the manger scene, often a cave, figures, animals, moss, and occasionally running water. “The aim is to depict a rolling countryside, a hillside town, and a lonely stable.”

The putz can become an elaborate display, centering on the birth of Christ, but bringing in many other themes. These added figures are usually religious, such as Sir Galahad searching for the Holy Grail, or a scene of the conversion of the Indians. Some include the use of electricity, music, and narration. But the “Putz” is not to be garish, the traditional end result should “evoke a hush of silent contemplation.”

“Beltznickel”

Our modern Santa Claus, of course, evolved over many centuries to what he is today. December 6th was St. Nicholas Day in Catholic countries of Europe, and the Rhineland area became the center of a St. Nicholas cult. With the Reformation these saints days disappeared, and Protestants changed the focus to Christmas Eve and the arrival of Beltznickel (Belsnickel).

He was a figure to be feared, wearing a hat, wig, and long, heavy coat. In addition to his bag of goodies, he could also carry a switch to “punish” naughty children. In the old tradition, this figure could visit at any time during Advent, arriving with ringing sleigh bells and gifts of nuts, candies, and fruits for the children. John Joseph Stoudt describes the old tradition as follows…

He throws the gifts on the floor, demanding a “piece” performed by the children. They have prepared for this for months, and they say a poem or sing a song. He remains stern, with grim, forbidding countenance. When Beltznickel’s whip rattled the windows. the children were frightened and he was a creature to be feared. Sunday School Festivals in the Pennsylvania Dutch countryside continue this tradition of saying a “piece” for him, even though he may not show up.

In 1822, Clement C. Moore’s verses for “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” better known today as “The Night Before Christmas,” presented the fat, jolly man arriving from the skies. In 1862, famed illustrator Thomas Nast gave him further touches, and by 1886 Santa Claus had basically become the character we know today. “Santa Claus” seems to have come from the New York Dutch settlers’ “Sinter Klaus,” or St. Nicholas.

Indeed, even “Kriss Kringles” really comes form the German for Christ Child (Christ- Kindel). In the 1800’s, children were told it was the Christ Child who brought gifts for them at Christmas. Children left baskets of hay for His mule at the door on Christmas Eve. Apparently many Pennsylvania Germans were displeased as the name and identity changed to become associated with Santa Claus.

The Tree

Finally, let us return to the Christmas tree and its German beginnings. While it is doubtful Luther started the custom …

It was among Lutherans that the tree first became a Christmas tradition. The earliest written record of a fully decorated Christmas tree dates from 1605, when a citizen of Strasbourg wrote that “at Christmas they set up fir trees in the parlors and hang upon them roses cut from many-colored paper, apples, wafers, gilt-sugar, sweets, etc.”

These Old World Germans decorated their tree “with stars, angels, toys, gilded nuts, and candies wrapped in bright papers. Later they added tinsel and lighted candles.”

It is claimed that the first known written mention of a Christmas tree in America is found in the 1821 diary of Matthew Zahn, a Lancastrian! Undoubtedly, the Christmas tree tradition was brought to America by the German settlers, and trees were fairly common by the 1820’s. It may very well be that Lancaster is the home of the Christmas tree in America!

Our Heritage

Regardless of your feelings concerning Christmas celebrations today, it is clear we owe a great deal to the Pennsylvania Germans who brought their customs to the New World. In understanding this heritage, perhaps we can better appreciate the real meanings and history behind the symbols and modern images so prevalent today.

Amish Country News Cover Article by Brad Igou (Winter 1998)

English: Santa Claus as illustrated in , v. 52...
English: Santa Claus as illustrated in , v. 52, no. 1344 (December 3 1902), cover. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mother’s Funeral at the Oaklawn Cemetery, Somerville, Texas, March 2012

All the cousins made possible because of Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill and Leroy Eugene Frederick. Daniel Renz, standing behind Keli— with Jason FallinCraig Moore,Sarah MooreKeli DanielsDrew VanderfordJustin VanderfordJoseph FrederickRobin Sira Brant,Stefanie Hyden Bush and Johnathan Frederick atOaklawn Cemetery, Somerville, TX.Jean Mancill funeral, March 2012, Somerville, TX

Gartenzwerg Means Literally “garden dwarf” in Germany

Gardengnome face

Garden gnome 01050
Garden gnome 01050 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
A picture of a "liberated" gnome at ...
A picture of a “liberated” gnome at Big Ben in London (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: a mushroom-holding garden gnome Neder...
English: a mushroom-holding garden gnome Nederlands: Tuinkabouter met paddestoel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: a garden gnome in italy
English: a garden gnome in italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Norwegian garden gnome
Norwegian garden gnome (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
A replica of Lampy the Lamport Gnome
A replica of Lampy the Lamport Gnome (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Small garden gnome

A garden gnome or lawn gnome is a figurine of a small humanoid creature, usually wearing a pointy hat, produced for the purpose of ornamentation and protection from evil sorcery, typically of gardens or on lawns. These figurines originate in 19th century Germany, where they became known as Gartenzwerg (literally “garden dwarf“). The application of the term gnome in English is first attested in the 1930s.  

Gnomes are often depicted as having beards and are typically males, and usually wear red hats and are known to smoke pipes. They are made in various poses and pursuing various pastimes, such as fishing or napping.[11]

Gnomes have become controversial in serious gardening circles in the UK, and have been banned from the prestigious Chelsea Flower Show as the organisers claim that they detract from the garden designs. Gnome enthusiasts accuse the organisers of snobberybecause they are popular in working class and suburban gardens.[12]

Gnomes may be made from terracotta clay slip (runny clay) poured into molds. This is allowed to set up and the excess emptied from the centre leaving a clay shell. The gnome is removed from the mold when firm, then allowed to dry and then fired in a kiln until hard. Once cooled the gnome is painted. More modern gnomes are made from resins and similar materials. source: Wikipedia

German garden gnome

Santa Garden Gnome

My mother was fond of Gnomes, but I had never thought anything of them, except that they were kind of cute.  My husband has carved us Garden Gnomes out of wood from a tree that was blown down by Hurricane Ike. He even made me one with a Santa Claus suit. 

My Linderman ancestor, my fifth great grandfather was Johann Jacob Linderman (Lindermann). He was 18, and EMIGRATED FROM ZWEIBRUCKEN, GERMANY TO ROTTERDAM, AMSTERDAM, [THE NETHERLANDS], ON 25 NOVEMBER 1740, ON THE SHIP: LOYAL JUDITH, CAPTAIN LOVELL PAINTER WAS THE  COMMANDER, TO THE PORT OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA. IT WAS A TWELVE WEEK TRIP. Johann Jacob Linderman  resided in German Flatts, Germantown Township, Pennsylvania in December 1740.

He married Catharine McLean in 1743 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. They had eleven children together.

Holly Belsnickel CHRISTmas Santa

Germantown Celebrates Its 300th Birthday

English: Dip at creek crossing along NY 9G in ...
English: Dip at creek crossing along NY 9G in Germantown, NY, USA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
View of Catskills looking over Hudson River fr...
View of Catskills looking over Hudson River from near Rhinecliff, NY, USA, in the Hudson River Historic District, a National Historic Landmark (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Stone Jug, contributing property to H...

My fourth great grandfather, Ezekiel Linderman and his wife, Margarett (Ridner) Linderman were married in the Brick Reformed German Church in Shawangunk, Ulster County, New York, on March 28, 1793.

The “poor Palatines” who settled in Columbia County 300 years ago left a rich and proud legacy

BY DAVID LEVINE PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 14, 2010 AT 03:48 PM

Signs of the past: Located on the Fingar Farm in Germantown, this house was built into the side of a hill, a style often used by the Palatines when they first arrived

Signs of the past: Located on the Fingar Farm in Germantown, this house was built into the side of a hill, a style often used by the Palatines when they first arrived

Photographs courtesy of Germantown History Department

You don’t have to be smarter than a fifth-grader to know that this country’s first European settlers were the Dutch, Spanish, and English. But another country soon followed these pioneers and, in the end, sent more people here than any of the others. 
That country is Germany. It’s true. Ask your fifth grader — or just about anyone in the Columbia County town of Germantown. This month, Germantown celebrates the 300th anniversary of the arrival of the largest group of Hudson Valley settlers in Colonial times: farmers from the Palatine region of southwest Germany, who settled here in October 1710.

A little history: The German Palatines were natives of the Rhine ValleyPalatinate region of southwest Germany. Through much of the 17th and early 18th centuries, the region was fraught with war, famine, and devastation. Refugees were known as “the poor Palatines.”
About 13,000 poor Palatines fled to Holland and then to England between May and November 1709, but the British government failed to integrate them successfully. So they transported nearly 3,000 refugees in about a dozen ships to New York in 1710. About 850 families settled in the Valley, primarily in what are now Germantown and Saugerties. Many of them first were assigned to work camps along the Hudson to pay off the price of their passage.

map of germantownAn early map shows “Palatine Town”

“The area around Germantown was known as East Camp then,” says Nadine Rumke, a ninth-generation descendant of the Palatines and cochair of Germantown’s 300th Anniversary Committee. Rumke’s ancestors were the Hovers (then called Haber), and her family tree takes up 10 square feet of wall space. (It will be on display this month at the Parsonage, home of the Germantown History Department and the oldest structure in town, built in 1746.)

Germantown grew from four hamlets, which were established by Rumke’s ancestors and those of other residents still living in southern Columbia County. Those family names, including Rifenburgh (originally Reiffenberger), Clum (formerly Klumm), Fingar, Coons (from Kuhn), and many others still fill the local phone book and adorn nearby street signs.

Indeed, Helen Coons Henderson, 98, grew up on land that has been in her family for generations. She remembers her father, James Snyder Coons, telling stories of the early Palatine settlers’ struggles to survive. “There are stories of them eating grass in 1712,” says Henderson, who assists the Columbia County historian with research and helps the anniversary committee. Henderson’s grandmother was a Snyder, another Palatine family, originally called Schneider. These two families still celebrate Thanksgiving together, Palatine style, with fresh pork and root vegetables cooked according to 100-year-old recipes.

stone jug houseThe Stone Jug house in Clermont, which was built by Palatine tenant farmer Konradt Lasher in the mid-18th century and is a National Historic Landmark

A Rockin’ Oktoberfest

Events celebrating this tercentennial include history seminars; discussion groups; performances by the Germantown Choir; an original play put on by the students of Germantown Central School; and a concert debut by Germantown resident Harold Farberman, a renowned composer and conductor. A ecumenical church service will take place at the Christ Lutheran Church; the same location houses a Nuremberg bible from 1755 that was used by the Palatines.

A unique sculpture, the Germantown Analemma, has been created by local artists Dea Archbold and Kurt Holsapple. An astrological sundial, the analemma replicates the sun’s pathway over the Palatine settlers during their first year in their new settlement. Archbold and Holsapple, third cousins, are 10th-generation descendants of the original Palatine settlers. Practical astronomy was crucial to the Palatine farmers, they say. “They had to be very aware of where the sun was in the sky, when to plan for the harvest,” says Archbold. Holsapple adds, “We want to mark, in stone, the actual time of the Palatines’ arrival and other significant events in Germantown history.”

The initial weekend places a focus on history and heritage, with discussions and visits from nationwide experts on genealogy, DNA, and Palatine history. The Germantown Oktoberfest, this year renamed the Palatine Oktoberfest, takes place the second weekend. Highlights include festivities at Palatine Park, including farming and crafts displays, a German oompah band, a petting zoo, food, and fireworks. 
“During the first weekend, folks who think they may have Palatine roots will be able to find out more and maybe take a DNA test,” says Rumke. “We will hear great music, learn more about the history of our town, and — during the second weekend — have a wonderful time at a traditional Oktoberfest.”

reformed church of germantownSplendid spires: Organized in 1728, the Reformed Church of Germantown has used three different buildings during its history; the current structure (shown) was built in 1880

Schedule of events:

Oct. 1 Germantown Central School

Presentation to students: The Palatines from Southwest Germany
Henry Z. Jones, genealogist and historian; the Rev. David Jay Webber, historian and Palatine descendant

Oct. 2 Germantown Central School

11 a.m.: Aspects of Palatine History: The Palatines in Germantown
Prof. Philip Otterness, historian and author ofBecoming German: The 1709 Palatine Migration to New York; Henry Z. Jones, genealogist; David Jay Webber, historian; Alice Clark, Palatine DNA Project
3-4:30 p.m. Seminar participants available to discuss genealogy

Oct. 3

8-9:15 a.m.: Anniversary breakfast hosted by Christ Lutheran Church, Viewmonte
10 a.m.: Ecumenical anniversary worship service, Christ Lutheran Church
3 p.m.: Gala Palatine Concert, Reformed Church of Germantown. Premiere of commissioned work for voice and instruments by Harold Farberman, composer/conductor and longtime Germantown resident. Also features a performance of 18th-century hymns by the Southern Columbia Community Choir.

Oct. 8 Palatine Oktoberfest & Harvest Festival Kick-Off

The Palatine Parade, Main St. to Palatine Park: Wagons salute local farmers, town businesses, and GCS students, with music along the way.
Activities at Palatine Park: German, Austrian, Polish, and other varieties of music, food, crafts, demonstrations, and exhibits. Free horse- and tractor-drawn wagon rides, community bonfire

Oct. 9 Palatine Oktoberfest & Harvest Festival

11 a.m.: Opening Ceremony at Palatine Park. German, Austrian, Polish, and other varieties of music; dancing; food booths (including German dinners); crafts; demonstrations; and exhibits. Evening dance for teens, free horse- and tractor-drawn wagon rides, fireworks

Oct. 10 Palatine Oktoberfest & Harvest Festival

11 a.m.: German oompah band and other music, dancing, food booths, craft booths, demonstrations, exhibits, free horse- and tractor-drawn wagon rides
7 p.m.: Closing Ceremony

Germantown, New York
Germantown, New York (Photo credit: Dougtone)
Ongoing activities

The Palatine Analemma: An original wall sculpture designed by Palatine descendants Dea Archbold and Kurt Holsapple
Oral histories and historic documents: Germantown Library 
The Palatine Archeology Project: At the Parsonage, oldest structure in Germantown and home of the Germantown History Department. Excavation of artifacts led by Prof. Christopher Lindner, Bard College archeologist-in-residence.
Field and lab school for Germantown School students and teachers; found artifacts to be displayed in June at the Germantown Library
The Palatine Mural: Wall of the “Salt Shed,” Palatine Park: Anniversary Palatine mural on one side of the building, created by Germantown volunteers led by James Warhola, well-known children’s book author and artist.
The Palatine Plaque: A listing of Palatine families (location TBA)
For more information, visit www.germantownnyhistory.org or call 518-537-6687, ext. 30

My Maternal Grandfather, Harry William “Billy” Linderman

Second wife of my maternal grandfather,  Martha  “Mattye” Mae (Burden) Johnston Linderman & Harry William “Billy” Linderman, March 23, 1986, Houston, Texas. They married on July 13, 1966 in Richmond, Fort Bend County, Texas. They resided at 2727 Drexel Drive, Houston, Texas.

“HARRY WAS RAISED LUTHERAN. HE WAS THE ONLY SON OF EDWARD FRANCIS & GUDRUN (LUND)LINDERMAN. HIS FATHER NICKNAMED HIM “BILLY”, AND HIS MOTHER CALLED HIS FATHER” EDDIE”. EDWARD CALLED GUDRUN “GUD“. HE HAD THREE SISTERS, GLADYS, IRENE, AND EVELYN LINDERMAN.

HARRY LINDERMAN WAS THE GRANDSON OF MARY LINDERMAN OF WINONA, MINNESOTA, GREAT-GRANDSON OF ABRAHAM LINDERMAN AND MARIA A. “MARY” HAMMELL OF WINONA, MINNESOTA AND CRAWFORD, NEW YORK. HARRY WAS A SUAVE, DEBONAIR  WELL-MANNERED GENTLEMAN.

HARRY MARRIED PHYLLIS ADELE “EUGENIA” PALEN ON FEBRUARY 27, 1823 IN CLAYTON, IOWA.

HE WAS RAISED AT 705 WEST THIRD ST, DUBUQUE,DUBUQUE CO, IOWA. THE LINDERMAN CHILDREN WERE RAISED LUTHERAN. HE ATTENDED LINCOLN SCHOOL, DUBUQUE,IOWA FROM SEPT. 1909- JUNE 1915. GRANDPA’S GRADES WERE ALL A’S. HARRY GRADUATED FROM DUBUQUE HIGH SCHOOL IN JUNE 1921.

HE WAS A VERY INTELLIGENT,WELL MANNERED GENTLEMAN. HARRY WAS A SUAVE, DEBONAIR GENTLEMEN. HARRY WORKED AS DISTRICT SALESMAN,AND THEN SALES MANAGER IN THE REFRACTORY [FIRE BRICK] DEPARTMENT, AT HOUSTON BUILDER’S SUPPLY, AT 119 NORTH HAMILTON, HOUSTON, TEXAS.

THEN, HARRY AND PHYLLIS (PALEN) LINDERMAN, STARTED THEIR OWN BUSINESS IN HOUSTON,TEXAS, CALLED “LINBAR INC,” IN 1952, AND RAN IT UP UNTIL 1970. IT WAS INSTALLING FURNACES. HE WORKED FOR “FLEXIBLE WALLS,INC.” FROM 1970-1972. “DRYWALL INC.” FROM 1972-1977, AND “EAVES CONSTRUCTION, INC.” FROM 1977-1982. HARRY RETIRED FROM HIS BOOKKEEPING POSITION WITH “EAVES CONSTRUCTION, INC. AT THE AGE OF 80 IN 1982.

HARRY & PHYLLIS BOUGHT A HOME AT 4002 ARNOLD IN WEST UNIVERSITY PLACE, HOUSTON,TEXAS.

THEY ALSO BUILT A SUMMER PLACE, AND A TAVERN IN GAYHILL, BURLESON COUNTY, TEXAS. THE TAVERN WAS NAMED “SATURDAY’S TAVERN”. HARRY RAN THE BAR, PHYLLIS PLAYED THE PIANO, AND AUNT PATSY (LINDERMAN) COOKE & UNCLE KENNETH EDWARD JACKSON SANG IN THE TAVERN. OUR FAMILY LOVED THE “NIGHT LIFE”.

GRANDPA WAS THE FAMILY BARBEQUER, AND HE BUILT A HUGE, BRICK BARBECUE PIT. HARRY & PHYL LINDERMAN, JEAN & LEROY FREDERICK, PATSY & JAY COOKE, AND BILLIE & KEN JACKSON SPENT MANY A SUMMER WEEKEND TOGETHER IN THE COUNTRY.

HARRY WILLIAM LINDERMAN WAS THE CHAIRMAN OF THE REPUBLICAN PARTY OF HARRIS COUNTY IN HOUSTON, TEXAS IN 1954.

HARRY SOLD THE FAMILY HOME AT 4002 ARNOLD TO HELP PAY FOR PHYL’S MEDICAL BILLS. PHYLIS PALEN LINDERMAN DIED OF HODGEKIN’S DISEASE ON 27 DEC. 1963, IN HOUSTON, HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS.

HARRY’S SECOND WIFE WAS MARTHA “MATTYE” (BURDEN) JOHNSTON. THEY MARRIED IN RICHMOND,FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS ON JULY 13, 1966. HARRY AND MATTYE RESIDED AT 2727 DREXEL DRIVE, HOUSTON,TEXAS FROM 1966 TO 1995. THEY WERE MARRIED FOR TWENTY EIGHT YEARS.

GRANDPA HARRY WAS THE FAMILY PHOTOGRAPHER, AND HISTORIAN. BETWEEN 1950 AND 1960 GRANDPA TOOK ROLLS AND ROLLS OF 8mm. MOVIE FILM OF OUR FAMILY. MOST OF THE ROLLS WERE DESTROYED IN THE FLOOD FROM TROPICAL STORM ALLISON ON 8 JUNE 2001, AT 11039 LAFFERTY OAKS STREET, HOUSTON, TEXAS.

GRANDPA-HARRY WILLIAM & GRANDMA-PHYLLIS ADELE (PALEN) LINDERMAN WERE ALWAYS THE GRACIOUS HOSTS. THEY WERE LOVED BY ALL.

HARRY’S FATHER WAS GERMAN, AND HIS MOTHER WAS NORWEGIAN. HARRY’S WORD WAS HIS BOND. HE WAS HONEST, HARD-WORKING, AND RESPONSIBLE. HE LOVED HIS FAMILY! THIS LINDERMAN DESCENDANT IS VERY PROUD OF HIM.”

Jean Marie Linderman Frederick and Leroy Eugene Frederick Family

Texas Tudors' Blog

I love this picture of Norman Rockwell‘s Thanksgiving. It is one of my favorites. This pic represents how I feel about our Thanksgiving tradition. God has blessed me with a loving, forgiving close-knit Patriotic American family.

My Mother and Father had six wonderful children in twenty one years of marriage. We were raised at 1709 Cheston Drive, in Jacinto City, Texas from 1947-1968.

 

English: Former Jacinto City Preschool

View original post

German Ancestors – Dubuque, Iowa

 

 

 

 

Texas Tudors' Blog

My Great Aunt Glady Serene Linderman Nelson would have been 106 years of age today. She always remembered our birthdays, even nieces and nephews, that she had never met. She never forgot to send a birthday card with a dime or quarter. She did not have much, but whatever she could send she would. It impressed on my little mind growing up, that someone all the way up in Dubuque, Iowa was thinking about me.

It made me feel special.

Besides the fact that we didn’t get much mail, and when a letter was just for me, it was exciting. Aunt Glady was a Proofreader for the Dubuque Telegraph Herald newspaper for years. She was the strong matriarch in the Nelson clan. She divorced and moved to the Linderman Home place at 705 West Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa with her widowed father. Glady cared for her father up until his…

View original post 559 more words

Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill – Houston, Harris, Texas

Texas Tudor's Memorials

 

English: Photograph of the skyline of Downtown...

Jean Marie “Jeanie” Linderman Mancill
Birth: Dec. 3, 1927
Dubuque
Dubuque County
Iowa, USA
Death: Mar. 9, 2012
Rosharon
Brazoria County
Texas, USA

Jean Marie (Linderman)Frederick Mancill, daughter of Phyllis “Phyl” (Palen) Linderman and Harry William Linderman. Granddaughter of Frank Joseph Palen and Emma Elsie (Claussen) Palen, also of Edward Francis Linderman and Gudrun Ivarra (Lund)Linderman of Dubuque, Iowa.
First huband LeRoy Eugene Frederick. Married 15 November 1947, Liberty, Texas. Divorced 1968. the Frederick homestead was at 1709 Cheston Drive, Jacinto City, Texas 77029.
Six children together: Joseph Lee, Phyllis Jean, Sally Ann, Karl Thomas, Patricia Marie, and Sarah Kay Frederick.
Mother was a very loving and creative woman. She taught me how to sew at 16, she made us a braided rug(I still have today), she knitted, crocheted, needlepointed, and quilted.
Second husband Louis “Honey Lou” Clifford Mancill. Married 5 December 1968, Houston, Texas

View original post 558 more words

Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – German Ancestors

Texas Tudor's Memorials

English: Flag of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. I...English: Seal of the city of ,pennsylvania welcomes you

Johann Jacob Linderman was my fifth great grandfather who emigrated in 1740 from Obermochel, Bayern, Germany to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He DID help build these United States! Yes, he did build this!! JOHANN JACOB LINDERMAN SERVED IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR BETWEEN 1775-1781. HE WAS IN THE COLONIAL PENNSYLVANIA ARMY.

Married Catharina McLean in Lancaster, Pennsylvania in 1743. They had eleven children together.  He resided in Germantown Township, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in December 1740. 

View original post

Hello Family History Buffs!

Dubuque, IowaDubuque, Iowa

Germany
Germany (Photo credit: sanctumsolitude)

My mother was Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill. She was born in Dubuque, Iowa on 3 December 1927, and died on 9 March 2012 in Rosharon, Texas. 

My maternal grandmother was Phylis Adele Palen Linderman, and she was born in Bemedji, Minnesota.

My maternal grandfather was Harry William Linderman born in Winona, Minnesota. My maternal grandmother was an artist and pianist. Her last painting was of some huge Sunflowers. She died from Hodgekin’s Disease at M.D. Anderson Cancer Hospital, in 1963 in Houston, Texas. My grandparents moved from Dubuque, Iowa to Indianapolis, Indiana to Houston, Texas in 1945. My grandfather had his own company, Linbar Inc. and he was a Combustion Engineer. 

My maternal great grandmother was Emma Elsie Claussen Palen who married Frank Joseph Palen of Caledonia, Minnesota.  The Palens emigrated from Bachlieden, Luxembourg in 1862. The Claussens emigrated from Hanover, Prussia, Germany in 1855.

The Lindermans emigrated from Obermoschel, Pfalz, Bayern, Germany in 1740 and helped to form these United States. My great grandmother, Gudrun Ivarra Lund emigrated from Namsos, Norway in 1896 to Ellis Island, New York, New York. She was only fifteen. She married Edward Francis Linderman in Winona, Minnesota.

I have over 12,000 people in my RootsMagic database now. I have been working on my husband’s and my family history since 1987. I have been unable to decide how to pull it all together. There is so much data, that I felt overwhelmed and procrastinated on putting my books together. I think that I have finally decided that if I don’t get this history down on paper or in books, that I will be gone and no one else is surviving in our family that would know the history that I do. I have collected so much information over these years. I will be adding more as time allows. 

lake-beltrami-bemidji-minnesota

Lake Beltrami – Bemidji, Minnesota

The American Revolutionary War: 1775-1781

Uploaded by LisaJ4Liberty on Sep 30, 2009 Hi everyone! I really didn’t make this video in order to say: rah rah America kicks ass! I’m just a fan of the principals of liberty that Jefferson, Franklin and others stood for back when the declaration of independence was written & this video is a tribute to the intellect and bravery of the founders. For those unfamiliar with American history.

This video begins with vintage pictures of the American colonists’ domestic life — circa 1776. Next, mother country England imposes its tyrannical decrees: the *Stamp Act* and the *Tea Tax*. Next, the colonists’ violent rebellions in Boston, followed by the writing of the *Declaration of Independence* by John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin. And finally a war against England led by George Washington. The pivotal point of the war was the crossing of the Delaware River at night for a successful sneak attack on the enemy in the early morning. With the help of the French the war is finally won, and so is the Founding Fathers’ vision of an independent Constitutional Republic.

HISTORY OF ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK: ORANGE COUNTY WAS THE ORIGINAL COUNTY OF NEW YORK. HENRY HUDSON [ENGLISH] EXPLORED THE AREA IN 1609. IT IS NAMED FOR THE PRINCE OF ORANGE [WILLIAM III OF HOLLAND]. THE FIRST SETTLERS IN THE WALLKILL VALLEY, NEW YORK IN 1614 WERE HOLLANDERS, HUGUENOTS, AND GERMANS. SIX YEARS BEFORE THE PILGRIMS LANDED AT PLYMOUTH ROCK [BOULDER AT PLYMOUTH , MASSACHUSETTS WHERE THE PILGRIMS WHO SAILED ON THE SHIP MAYFLOWER ARE SAID TO HAVE LANDED IN 1620]; MASSACHUSETTS A NEW ENGLAND STATE, WAS ONE OF THE ORIGINAL 13 STATES OF THE U.S. CRAWFORD, ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK WAS HILL COUNTRY. THE DUTCH EAST INDIA COMPANY BROUGHT THE FIRST WHITE SETTLERS IN 1684, AND BUILT NEWBURGH, ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK. NEW YORK WAS A PROVINCE THEN WITH SHIRES, AND COUNTIES. BRICK REFORMED CHURCH IN MONTGOMERY, ORANGE COUNTY, NEW YORK WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1732. IT HAD CATECHISM CLASSES, INSTEAD OF SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASSES LIKE WE HAVE NOW IN THE 1990’S. THE LINDERMAN’S WERE SOME OF THE ORIGINAL SETTLERS OF NEW YORK IN THE 1740’S, THEY EMIGRATED TO PENNSYLVANIA IN 1684. THEY WERE LUTHERANS AND PROTESTANTS.

My fifth Great Grandfather was Johann Jacob Linderman, who emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1740 from Obermoschel, Pfalz, Germany. He was born there on 2 December 1720. Married Catherine McLean in 1743 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They settled in Germantown Township, Pennsylvania. JOHANN JACOB LINDERMAN SERVED IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR BETWEEN 1775-1781. HE WAS IN THE COLONIAL PENNSYLVANIA ARMY.

U.S. Naturalization Records: “JACOB LINTIMAN, AGE 18, EMIGRATED FROM ZWEIBRUCKEN, GERMANY TO ROTTERDAM, AMSTERDAM, [THE NETHERLANDS], ON 25 NOVEMBER 1740, ON THE SHIP: LOYAL JUDITH, CAPTAIN LOVELL PAINTER WAS THE COMMANDER, TO THE PORT OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA. IT WAS A TWELVE WEEK TRIP.”

Battle of Yorktown -1781 – End of American Revolutionary War

Donald Wayne Tudor

Birth: Dec. 9, 1927 Stephenville Erath County Texas, USA Death: Apr. 16, 2012 Uvalde Uvalde County Texas, USA [Edit Dates]

Parents: Sol Ross “Conrad” Tudor & Bergie Mae (Mobley) Tudor of Stephenville, Texas. His brothers, Leonard Doyle, & Raymond Horton Tudor preceded him in death. His sister, Mae Corrine Tudor (Williams) also preceded him in death. Grandparents: Thomas Benton “T.B.” Tudor & Sallie Hampton (Keith) Tudor of Tippah County, Mississippi.

Great Grandparents: Jesse Gee Tudor & Eliza Jane Boone Cutbirth Tudor of Tennessee. Married: Annie Mae (McCann) 11 May 1955 in Stephenville, TX. Wayne was a proud World War II veteran of Air Force. Children: Leonard “Len” Ross, Anita Corrine “Nita”, and Donald “Don” Raymond Tudor. Step son, Steve Morgan. Beloved father, honorable husband, and proud Air Force Veteran of World War II. Served his community all his life. He was a unselfish person, who helped when he could.

Resided: Uvalde, Texas. His wife, Annie Mae, and step son, Steve Morgan, cared for him at home until just before his passing. Died in the Uvalde Hospital, Uvalde, Texas on 16 April 2012 Visitation held in Uvalde and Stephenville, Texas. Funeral services at the Stephenville Funeral Home, Stephenville, Texas. Burial on 22 April 2012 in the West End Cemetery, Stephenville, Texas.

Parents: Sol Ross Tudor (1890 – 1968) Bergie Mae Mobley Tudor (1899 – 1941) Burial: West End Cemetery Stephenville Erath County Texas, USA Created by: TEXAS TUDORS Record added: Apr 23, 2012 Find A Grave Memorial# 88992355

</blockquote>

My Mother~~My Heroine

Birth: Dec. 3, 1927 Dubuque Dubuque County Iowa, USA Death: Mar. 9, 2012 Rosharon Brazoria County Texas, USA

Jean Marie (Linderman)Frederick Mancill, daughter of Phyllis “Phyl” (Palen) Linderman and Harry William Linderman. Granddaughter of Frank Joseph Palen and Emma Elsie (Claussen) Palen, also of Edward Francis Linderman and Gudrun Ivarra (Lund)Linderman of Dubuque, Iowa.

Wife of LeRoy Eugene Frederick. Married 15 November 1947, Liberty, Texas. Divorced 1968. Six children together: Joseph Lee, Phyllis Jean, Sally Ann, Karl Thomas, Patricia Marie, and Sarah Kay Frederick.

Wife of Louis Clifford Mancill. Married 5 December 1968, Houston, Texas. He preceded her in death. No children of this union. One step son, Michieal Wayne Mancill. Mother just passed today, March 9, 2012, in Rosharon, Texas. She left us peacefully to be with Jesus. I am so grateful to have been able to spend the last six years living together with Mother. We got to be even closer than ever. She was blessed with a good life, and a good family.

The services were held Tuesday, March 13, 2012 at Strickland Funeral Homes, in Somerville, TX, and burial followed at the same Oaklawn Cemetery, the same one where Aunt Yvonne, Uncle Kenneth, and Aunt Billie are buried.

Mother left us just like she wanted to. She was at home surrounded with family that loved her. She just drifted off, and the angels came to get her. My consolation was she was not in pain, and not alone, and I was able to be there with her for her last week of her life.

Mother’s viewing was held on Monday, March 12, 2012 from 4-9pm. The funeral services were on Tuesday, March 13, 2012 @11am @ Oaklawn Cemetery Pavilion, on Hwy. 36 in Somerville, TX. location at:, Strickland Funeral Home at 545 8th Street, SOMERVILLE, TEXAS 77879, (979)596-2133.

Family links: Parents: Harry William Linderman (1903 – 1995) Phyllis Eugenia Palen Linderman (1904 – 1963) Spouses: LeRoy Eugene Frederick (1926 – 2006) Louis Clifford Mancill (1924 – 2002) Burial: Oaklawn Cemetery Somerville Burleson County Texas, USA Created by: TEXAS TUDORS Record added: Mar 10, 2012 Find A Grave Memorial# 86532980

LeRoy & Jean (Linderman) Frederick Children

This is one of my favorite pics of Patricia, Karl, Sarah, & Sally Frederick, @ 11039 Lafferty Oaks St., Houston, TX 77013, 713-674-1600 @ Jean (Linderman) Frederick Mancill & Louis Clifford Mancill’s home, in Wood Shadows. We have had many a happy years here at Lafferty Oaks. We have been through 3-1/2 feet of water in our home during Tropical Storm Allison in July 2001. We worked our butts off gutting out, and remodeling it for a over a year. Karl & I attended Houston ISD school @ Furr High School in Houston, TX. I graduated in May 1972.
Patricia & Sarah lived with Daddy & Barbara Frederick (my step mother) @ 509 Marblehead St., Dayton, TX with Barbara’s children: Jeanna & Joey Faulk. They all attended Dayton ISD schools.
My Mother taught me how to sew at the age of 16, and I made the outfit that I am wearing. Mother made the Raggedy Ann dolls for Sarah & Patricia “Tricia” for Christmas one year.
God blessed us with a Godly Mother and Father, that taught us about God and Jesus. They taught us morals and manners.
All six of Mother’s children all grew up to be fine upstanding American citizens. We took lots of trips to New Braunfels, and Galveston, TX for vacations. Mother and my Step Dad, Louis Clifford Mancill, bought some land up at Sam Houston Lake Estates, near Cleveland, TX in 1969. My Dad built us a two-story house, we call it the “Cabin”. It was our vacation home on the Lake for the weekends. My son, Jason Fallin, learned how to fish on the pier there at the house. We still have that house today. We are richly blessed.

Posted by Picasa

Karl Thomas Frederick

My baby brother, Karl Thomas Frederick, at the Harry & Phyllis “Phyl” (Palen) Linderman home @ 4102 Arnold Street, Houston, Texas, c. 1958.
Posted by Picasa

History of Palatine Immigration and Ship Passenger Lists

History of the Palatine Immigration to Pennsylvania

as written by Daniel Rupp, 1876

At different periods, various causes and diverse motives induced Germans to abandon their Vaterland. Since 1606, millions have left their homes, the dearest spots on earth, whither the heart always turns. Religious persecution, political oppression drove thousands to Pennsylvania – to the asylum from the harrassed and depressed sons and daughters of the relics of the Reformation, whither William Penn himself invited the persecuted of every creed and religious opinion.

From 1682 to 1776, Pennsylvania was the central point of emigration from Germany, France and Switzerland. Penn’s liberal views, and illiberal course of the government of New York toward the Germans, induced many to come to this Province

The period from 1702 – 1727 marks an era in the early German emigration. Between forty and fifty thousand left their native country “their hearths where soft affections dwell.” The unparalleled ravages and desolations by the troops of Louis XIV under Turenne, were the stern prelude to bloody persecutions. To escape the dreadful sufferings awaiting them, German and other Protestants emigrated to the English colonies in America.

In 1705, a number of German Reformed residing between Wolfenbuttel and Halberstadt, fled to Neuwied, a town of Rhenish Prussia, where they remained some time, and then went to Holland – there embarked, in 1707, for New York. Their frail ship was, by reason of adverse winds, carried into the Delaware bay. Determined, however, to reach the place for which they were destined – to have a home among the Dutch, they took the overland route from Philadelphia to New York. On entering the fertile, charming valley in New Jersey, which is drained by the meandering Musconctcong, the Passaic and their tributaries, and having reached a goodly land, they resolve to remain in what is now known as the German Valley of Morrison county. From this point, the Germans have spread into Somerset, Bergan and Essex couties.

At Elizabethtown, where the first English settlement was made in New Jersey, 1664, there were many Germans prior to 1730. There was also a German settlement at a place known as Hall Mill, which is some thiry miles from Philadelphia.

In 1708 and 1709, thirty three thousand, on an invitation of Queen Anne, left their homes in the Rhine country for London, where some twelve or thirteen thousand arrived in the summer of 1708. There were books and papers dispersed in the Palatinate, with the Queen’s picture on the books, and the title page in letters of gold, which, on that account, were called, ‘The Golden Book’, to encourage the Palatines to come to England, in order to be sent to the Carolinas, or to other of Her Majesty’s colonies, to be settle there. These were, for some time, in a destitute condition – wholly depending upon the charity of the inhabitants of the English metropolis.

In the fall of 1709, one hundred and fifty families, consisting of six hundred and fifty Palatines, were transported, under the tutelar auspices of Christian De Grafferied and Ludwig Michell, natives of Switzerland, to North Carolina. As in all new countries, the Palatines were exposed to trials, privations and hardships incident to border life. One hundred of them were massacred by the Tuskarora Indians, Sept 22, 1707. The descendants of these Germans reside in different parts of the State.

At the time these Palatines left England for North Carolina, the Rev. Joshua Kockerhal, with a small band of his persecuted Lutheran brethren, embarked at London 1708, for New York, where they arrived in December, and shortly therafter he, with his little flock, settled on some lands up the Hudson river, which they had received from the crown of England. Two thousand one hundred acres, granted a patent Dec. 18, 1709. The Queen also bestowed upon Kocherthal five hundred acres as a glebe (transcriber’s note: glebe is a plot of land belonging or yielding profit to an English parish church) for the Lutheran church. Newburg is the place of this settlement.

In the meantime, while those were transported to North Carolina, and to New York, three thousand six hundred Germans were transfered to Ireland; seated upon unimproved lands in the county of Limerick, near Arbela and Adair; others, in the town of Rathkeale, where their descendants still reside, and are known to this day, as German Palatines, preserving their true German character for industry, thrift and honorable dealing. Persons who have lately visited them say, “They are the most wealthy and prosperous farmers in the county of Limerick.” They still speak the German language.

Of the large number that came to England, in 1708 and 1709, seven thousand, after having suffered great privations, returned, half naked and in despondency, to their native country. Ten thousand died for want of sustenance, medical attendance, and from other causes. Some perished on ships. The survivors were transported to English colonies in America. Several thousand had embarked for the Silly Islands, a group south-west of England; but never reached their intended destination.

Ten sails of vessels were freighted with upwards of four thousand Germans for New York. They departed the 25th December, 1709 and after a six months’ tedious voyage reached New York in June, 1710. On the inward passage, and immediately on landing, seventeen hundred died. The survivors were encamped in tents, the had brought with them from England, on Nutting, now Governor’s Island. Here they remained til late in autumn, when about fourteen hundred were removed, one hundred miles up the Hudson river, to Livingston Manor. The widowed women, sickly men and orphaned children remained in New York. The orphans were apprenticed by Governor Hunter, to citizens of New York and of New Jersey.

Thee settled on Hudson river were under indenture to serve Queen Anne as grateful subjects, to manufacture tar and raise hemp, in order to repay the expenses of their transport and cost of subsistence, to the amount of ten thousand pounds sterling, which had been advanced by parliamentary grant. A supply of naval stores from this arrangement, had been confidently anticipated. The experiment proved a complete failure. There was mismanagement.

The Germans, being unjustly oppressed, became dissatisfied both with their treatment, and with their situation. Governor Hunter resorted to violent measures to secure obedience to his demands. In this, too, he failed. One hundred and fifty families, to escape the certainty of famishing, left, in the autumn of 1712, for Schoharie Valley, some sixty miles, northwest of Livingston Manor. They had no open road, no horses to carry or haul their luggage – this they loaded on roughly constructed sleds, and did tug those themselves, through a three feet deep snow, which greatly obstructed their progress – their way was through an unbroken forest, where and when the wind was howling its hibernal dirge through leaf-stripped trees, amid falling snow. It took them three full weeks. Having reached Schoharie, they made improvements upon the lands Queen Anne had granted them. Here they remained about ten years, when owing to some defect in their titles, they were deprived of both lands and improvements. In the spring of 1723, thirty-three families removed and settled in Pennsylvania, in Tulpehocken, some fifteen miles west of Reading. A few years afterward, others followed them.

The other dissatisfied Germans at Schoharie, who did to choose to follow their friends to Pennsylvania sought for and found a future home on the frontier in Mohawk Valley.

Queen Anne, who well understood the policy of England, to retain her own subjects at home, encouraged the emigration of Germans, sent some of those whom she had invited in 1708 and 1709, to Virginia; settled them above the falls of the Rappahannock, in Spotsylvania county, where they commenced a town, called Germanna. The locality was unpropitious. They moved some miles further up the river where they soon drove well. From this settlement they spread into several counties in Virginia, and into North Carolina.

Because of the relentless persecution and oppression in Switzerland, a large body of defenseless Mennonites fled from the Cantons of Zurich; of Bern and Schaffhausen, about the year 1672, and took up their abode in Alsace, above Strasbourg, on the Rhine, where they remained till they emigrated, 1708, to London, thence to Pennsylvania. They lived some time at German town, and in the vicinity of Philadelphia. In 1712, they purchases a large tract of land from Penn’s agents in Pequae, then Chester, now Lancaster county. Here this small colony erected some huts or long cabins, to serve temporarily as shelters.

Here the time and again persecuted and oppressed Swiss, separated from friends and much that makes life agreeable, hoped to unmolested begin anew. Here, surrounded on all sides by severed clans of Indians, they located in the gloomy silent shades of a virgin forest, whose undisturbed solitude was yet uncheered by the murmurs of the honey bee, or the twitterings of the swallow, those never-failing attendants upon the woodman’s axe. For the hum and warblings of those, they had not only the shout and song of the tawny sons of the forest, but also the nocturnal howlings of the over watchful dog baying at the sheeny queen of the night, as she moves stately on, reflecting her burrowed light. By way of variety, their ears were nightly greeted by the shrill, startling whoop of the owl, from some stridulous branches overhanging their cabins, and bending to the breeze of evening, or by the sinister croakings of some doleful night songsters in the continuous thickets.

This Swiss settlement formed the nucleus, or centre of a rapidly increasing Swiss, French and German population, in the Eden of Pennsylvania.

Hereafter, the influent accession from the European continent steadily increased, so much so, as to excite attention, and create no small degree of alarm of the “fearful of the day”.

Scarcely had the Mennonites commenced making their lands arable, when they sent a commissioner, Martin Kendig, to Germany and to Switzerland, to induce others to come to Pennsylvania. He was successful. There were large accessions to this new colony in 1711 and 1717 and a few years later. So great was the influx at this time of Swiss and German immigrants, as to call forth, as already stated, public attention, especially of those in office.

Governor Keith, says the record, “observed to the Board – the Governor’s council – that great numbers of foreigners from Germany, strangers to our language and constitution, having lately been imported into this Province, daily dispensed themselves immediatly after landing, without producing certificates from whence they came or what they are, and, as they seemed to have first landed in Britain, and afterwards to have left without any license from government, or as far as they know, so, in the same manner, they behaved here, without making the least application to him or any of the magistrates. That, as this practice might be of very dangerous consequence, since, by the same method, any number of foreigners, from any nation whatever, enemies as well as friends, might throw themselves upon us.” This was in 1717.

In 1719, Jonathan Dickinson remarked; “We are daily expecting ships from London, which bring over Palatines, in number about six or seven thousand. We had a parcel that came over about five years ago, who purchased land about sixty miles west of Philadelphia, and proved quiet and industrious.”

After 1716, Germans, a few French and Dutch, began to penetrate the forest or wilderness – some twenty, thirty, forty, others from sixty to seventy miles, west and north from the metropolis. Large German settlements had sprung up at different points within the present limits of Montgomery and Berks counties. At Goshenhoppen there was a German Reformed church, organized as early as 1717. Some Mennonites coming from the Netherlands, settled along the Pakilmomink (Perkioming) and Schkipeck (Skippack) a few years later.

The Germans were principally farmers. They depended more upon themselves than upon others. They wielded the mattock, the axe and the maul, and by the power of brawny arms rooted up the grubs, removed saplings, felled the majestic oaks, laid low the towering hickory; prostrated, where they grew, the walnut, poplar, chestnut – cleaved such as suited the purpose, into rails for fences – persevered untiringly until the forest was changed into arable field. They were those of whom Governor Thomas said, 1738: ‘This Province has been for some years the asylum of the distressed Protestants of the Palatinate, and other parts of Germany; and I believe, it may truthfully he said, that the present flourishing condition of it is in a great measure owing to the industry of those people; it is not altogether the fertility of the soil, but the number and industry of the people, that makes a country flourish.’

England understood well the true policy to increase the number of the people in her American colonies – she retained at home her own subjects, encourage the emigration of Germans; by this England was the gainer, without an diminution of her inhabitants.

Unreasonable as it may seen, it was this class of Germans, that were so much feared, “whose numbers from Germany at this rate, would soon produce a German colony here, and perhaps such a one as Britain once received from Saxony in the fifth century.”

In 1719, some twenty families of Selwartzenau Taufer arrived at Philadelphia. Some settle in German town, others located on the Skippack, in Oley.

About 1728 and 1729, the Germans crossed the Susquehanna, located within the present limits of York and Adams county, and made improvements under discouraging circumstances.

The tide of emigration from the continent of Europe was strong. Various influences were brought to bear upon the increase of the influx. In Pennsylvania, the Newlander, tools in the hands of shipowners, merchants and importers, contributed much to induce Germans to leave their homes. There were, besides these, another class, who were active in prevailing upon the inhabitants of Germany to abandon their country for the new world. These two classes, Newlander and speculators, resorted to diverse arts in order to effect their purposes. They gave these, whom they desired to abandon their homes, assurances, endorsed by solemn promises, that the Poet’s Arcadia had at last been found in America. To possess this, in Louisiana, on the banks of the Mississippi, several thousands left Germany in 1715 and 1717, under the leadership of the notorious John Law, who instead of bringing them immediately on their arrival in America, to the promised Eden, on the banks of the Father of the Western Water, landed them on the pontines (transcriber’s note: land bridge) of Biloxi near the Mobile. Here they were exposed, without protection against their many foes, for five years. Not one of them entered the promised paradise. Two thousand were consigned to the grave. The pallid survivors – about three hundred, finally seated on the banks of the Mississippi, 1722, some thirty or forty miles above New Orleans. Law had, through his agents, engaged twelve thousand Germans and Swiss. The sad fate of those of Biloxi was spread abroad, which deterred other from coming to participate in the promised blessings of the Elesyan fields, or to possess the Eldorado.

The three hundred on the Mississippi were very poor for some years. They had been reduced to the most extreme poverty. From these poor but honorable Germans, have spring says Gayarre, some of the most respectable citizens of Louisiana, and some of the wealthiest sugar planters in the State. Their descendants forgot the German language, and have adopted the French; but the name of many clearly indicate the blood coursing in their veins; nevertheless more than one name has been so frenchified as to appear of Gallic parentage. The coast, so poor and beggarly at first, and once known as the German coast, has since become the producer and the receptacle of such wealth, so as to be now know by the appropriate name of Coast of Gold.

In the spring of 1734, some Lutherans, known in history as Saltzburgers, from Saltzburg, a city of Upper Austria, arrived in Georgia. In Europe, they too had been the victims of bloody persecution. They had been driven from their country and their homes, on account of their unswerving attachment to the principles of the Gospel.

This devotedly pious band of Christians was accompanied by their attached pastors, the Rev’d John Martin Boltzius and Israel Christian Gronau, and an excellent schoolmaster, Christian Ortman. The Saltzburgers located in Effingham county and styled their first settlement Ebenezer, to express their unfeigned gratitude to the Lord, who had been to them a storing rock, a house of defence, to save them.

This German colony received accessions from time to time until they reached, prior to 1745, several hundred families. There were also many Germans residing in Savannah; besides some forty of fifty Moravians in the same state under the pastoral care for the Rev. David Nitschliman.

The Moravians made no permanent settlement in Georgia. When the Spanish War broke out, they removed, almost to a man, to the State of Pennsylvania, because it was contrary to their religious faith to take up arms in any cause.

In 1738, some arrived in Pennsylvania and located at Bethlehem. In 1740, those who had remained, left Georgia and joined their brethren in Pennsylvania. This, the mission among the Indians in Georgia, after a promising beginning, was at once suspended.

Before the Moravians came to Pennsylvania, a respectable number of Schwenkfelders and arrived, settling in Bucks and Philadelphia county, now Montgomery, Berks and Lehigh. The Schwenkfelders had intended, before leaving their homes in Europe, to embark for Georgia. They however, changed their minds and established themselves in the asylum for the oppressed, Pennsylvania.

In 1732, Monsieur Jean Pierre Pury of Neuchatel, Switzerland visited Carolina. Being encouraged by the government both of England and Carolina, he undertook to settle a colony of Swiss there. In 1732 one hundred and seventy persons were transported. These were soon followed by others. In a short time the colony consisted of three hundred persons. They settled on the north bank of the Savannah, built a town called Purysburgh, about thirty-six miles above the mouth of the river. The colony still continued to increase. In 1734, Pury brought two hundred and seventy persons more from Switzerland. All those were brought from Switzerland at the expense of Pury and several of his friends, who advanced him money for that purpose, he having spent the greatest part of his fortune in the prosecution of that design before he could bring it to execution. Thee were now nearly six hundred souls in this settlement.

This was done in pursuance of a scheme, proposed by Mr. Pury to the Assembly of South Carolina; his scheme was to propel the southern frontier of Carolina with brave and laborious people, such as the Swiss are known to be. The assembly highly approved of this scheme; to assist him in the execution of it, they passed an act, August 20, 1731, which secured to him a reward of £400, upon his bringing over to Carolina a hundred effective men. In this act the Assembly promised also to find provisions, tools, etc, for three hundred persons for one year. Purysburgh in 1747, contained more than one hundred houses tolerably well built.

In Colleton county, on the north bank of North Ediston river, 12 miles from its mouth, stands Wilton, or New London, consisting of 80 houses built by Swiss under the direction of Zuberbhuler, with leave from the Assembly. This town proved detrimental to Purysburgh, being in the heart of the county and near the capital; it drew people thither, who did not care to go to Purysburgh.

From 1740-1755, a great many Palatines were sent to South Carolina, They settled Orangeburg, Cougaree and Wateree. In 1765, upwards of six hundred from the Palatine and Swabia were sent over from London and had a township of land set apart for them.

In 1739, a number of Lutherans and German Reformed purchased a tract of land from General Waldo, and laid out the town Waldoborough, in Lincoln county, Maine. Bremen, a village in the same county, and Frankfort, in Waldo county, were undoubtedly laid out, or settled by Germans, as the names would indicate. During the Spanish and French War, in 1746, Waldoborough was laid in ashes by some Canadian Indians. Some of the inhabitants were massacred, others abducted. Not a few died from the ill-treatment received at the hands of the savages – some made their escape, and were dispersed in Canada. Waldoborough remained in ruins until 1750. In 1751, invited by those in authority, thirty German families, and in 1752, fifteen hundred individuals from Europe, persons of means, settled in Maine.

King George II of Great Britain, held out strong inducements, through very liberal promises, to all who would emigrate into, and settle Nova Scotia, when a considerable body of German, principally Hanoverians, left their country, embarked for America, landed at Chebucto Bay, near Halifax, the capital of Nova Scotia, where fourteen hundred and fifty-three re-embarked and landed at Marliguish, on the 7th of june, 1753. Here they laid out the flourishing town of Lundenburg. Here they were doomed to experience the same resistance from the natives which the colonists at Halifax had met with, in settling the Peninsula; and the early history of the place contains little else than a constant succession of struggles with the savages in which, notwithstanding the powerful protection they received from the government, they lost many lives. Their attempts at agriculture were therefore restricted within a very narrow compass, and the settlement of the adjoining country was retarded until the French power and influence in Nova Scotia were subdued.

From 1735, settlements in Pennsylvania multiplied rapidly; extended over vast regions, west of the Susquehanna, whither the Scotch-Irish had led the way. The German settlement kept pace with the native.

The Kau-ta-tn-chunk (Kittatiny or Blue Mountain) extending from the Delaware hundreds of miles westwards, was not an insurmountable barrier – that they crossed and laid out farms where shortly afterwards they, their wives and children, were exposed to the torch, hatchet and scalping knife of the savages, and their midnight assault and slaughter. Hundreds fell victims to the relentlessly cruel savage, along the Blue Mountains, south and north of them and along the Susquehanna, as far north as Penn’s Creek, from 1754-1763 and even at a later period. Among the massacred were many Germans – more than 300 in all.

Germans massacred, north of the Blue Mountain, within Monroe county, among other were: Guldin, Hoth or Huth, Bomper, Vanaken, Vanflor, Schnell, Hartman, Hage, Brundich, Hellman, Gonderman, Schleich, Muller, Vandelap, Decker, Van Gondie, Brinker. South and north of the same mountain, within the present limits of Northampton, Carbon and Lehigh – more than one hundred were killed. Among them were: Sohn, Klein, Bittenbender, Roth, Schaffer, Ancers, Nitschman, Senseman, Gattermyer, Fabricuius, Schwigert, Leslie, Presser, Depu.

Along the same mountain, within the limits of Berks, Lebanon and Dauphin county – Reichelsdorfer, Gerhart, Neidung, Klug, or Kluck, Linderman, Schott, Craushar, Zeissloff, Wunch, Dieppel, Henly, Spitler, Nocker, Maurer, Boshar, Fell, Kuhlmer, Lang, Trump, Yager, Sechler, Schetterly, Sauter, Geiger, Ditzler, Franz, Schnebele, Mosser, Fincher, Hubler, Marloff, Wolf, Handsche, Weisser, Miess, Lebenguth, Motz, Noah, Windelblech, Zeuchmacher, etc.

Prior to 1770, the wilderness of Pennsylvania was penetrated beyond the Allegheny Mountains. Settlements were effected within the present bounds of Westmoreland and other eastern counties of this state. A number of German families had located on the Monongahela as far up as Redstone, Brownsville, Fayette county. Here settled the Weismans, Pressers, Vervalsons, Delongs, Jungs, Martins, Shutts, Peters, Schwartz, Hutters, Cackeys, Abrahams, and others (the first Germans in Western Pennsylvania, located in Greene county. These were two brothers, the Eckerleins of Ephrata, who left there and settle in the depths of the wilderness in 1745. Prior to 1754, Wendel Braun, and his two sons, and Frederik Waltser, located four miles west of Uniontown.), whom that devoted minister of the cross, the Rev. John Conrad Bucher, visited in Nov 1768.

Palatine Passenger List Index

My Maternal German ancestors were Linderman and Jungs. Johann Jacob Linderman, born in1722 in Baden-Baden, Germany, emigrated on 25 August 1740 from Zweibrucken, Germany to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and he settled in Germantown Township, Pennsylvania in December 1740.  His wife was Catherine McLean. Johann Jacob Linderman served in American Revolutionary War from 1777-1781 in Pennsylania. Johann & Catherine (McLean) Linderman had eleven children together.

My Heroine-My Mother-Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill

Jean Marie Linderman Frederick-wife of Leroy Eugene Frederick-1709 Cheston Drive, Jacinto City, Harris, County, Texas 77029.

We lived there from 1948-1968. Mother raised six children and made a wonderful home for us all. Daddy worked for Brown & Root, Houston, TX for forty-six years. He was respected by all. Mother and Daddy made our house a home.

We had many a barbeque and backyard party, birthday parties, and all holidays. Daddy made his own barbeque sauce-he made the best barbequed chicken I have ever eaten. Mother was an excellent cook, and we had everything homemade by her. Mother even made us girls clothes.

Daddy had a beautiful yard always. Daddy passed away in Nov. 2006. We have a long legacy of love and family traditions.

Phyllis & Sally Frederick-1957-Jacinto City, Texas

(top left) Sally, Phyllis, and Joe Frederick, 1957, 4002 Arnold Street, Houston, Harris, Texas at Harry and Phyllis Linderman’s home. (top right) Patricia “Tricia” Marie Frederick at Linderman home, 1960. (bottom left) Jean cooking in our kitchen on Cheston Drive, Jacinto City, Harris, Texas. (bottom right) Patricia and Karl Frederick, 1962, Linderman home. 

Jean married LeRoy Eugene Frederick-Nov. 15, 1947 in Liberty, Texas. They were married for twenty-one years, and raised us six children to be good, honest, hard-working people. Obviously, they did a good job, because all of their children are good people. I am proud to be the daughter of Jean and LeRoy Frederick.

Mother and Daddy, Christmas 1957, at my maternal grandparents home, at 4002 Arnold Street, in Houston, Harris, Texas. 

Jean Marie Linderman Frederick Mancill and her father, Harry William Linderman, Cellar Door Restaurant, Stella Link, Houston, Harris, Texas for Aunt Yvonne Linderman Burgess Levesque’s Paralegal graduation in May 1980.

My Maternal Great Aunt, Gladys Serena Linderman Nelson

GladysSereneLinderman

Gladys Serene Linderman, Dubuque, Iowa, about 1922

Gladys Serene (Linderman) Nelson daughter of Edward “Edy” Francis Linderman and Gudrun (Lund) Linderman of Dubuque, Iowa, and wife of Roy Leonard Nelson Sr, about 1940

My Great Aunt Gladys Serene Linderman Nelson. She preferred Glady Serena.

Born: August 17, 1906 in Winona, Minnesota. Daughter of Edward Francis & Gudrun Ivarra Lund Linderman.
Baptized: Lutheran in Winona, Minnesota on November 11, 1906.

Name: Roy Leonard Nelson
Titles and Terms:
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 20 Nov 1926
Event Place: Dubuque, Iowa, United States
Age: 28
Birth Year (Estimated): 1898
Father’s Name: Louis Nelson
Father’s Titles and Terms:
Mother’s Name: Marie Carlson
Mother’s Titles and Terms:
Spouse’s Name: Gladys Linderman
Spouse’s Titles and Terms:
Spouse’s Age: 20
Spouse’s Birth Year (Estimated): 1906
Spouse’s Father’s Name: E F Linderman
Spouse’s Father’s Titles and Terms:
Spouse’s Mother’s Name: Gundrum Lund
Spouse’s Mother’s Titles and Terms:
Reference ID:
GS Film number: 1630957
Digital Folder Number: 004266276
Image Number: 00575

Married: Roy Leonard Nelson, Sr. 20 November 1926 in Dubuque, Iowa.

Children: Shirley Lorraine, Roy Leonard, Jr. and Richard Edward Nelson.
Died: April 28, 1996 in Houston, Texas. Cremated and her ashes were spread around her Mother, Gudrun Ivarra Lund Linderman’s gravside in Linwood Cemetery, in Dubuque, Iowa.

Harry, Gladys, Irene, & Mother, Gudrun (Lund) Linderman-Dubuque, Iowa

Arline “Babe” & Evelyn “Eppie” (Linderman) Ayala, Irene (Linderman) Weidner, Gladys (Linderman) Nelson, Statue of Liberty, New York City, New York, Oct. 1952.

name:Roy Nelson
titles & terms:
event:Census
event year:1940
event place:Ward 3, Sioux Falls, Sioux Falls City, Minnehaha, South Dakota, United States
gender:Male
age:41
marital status:Married
race (original):White
race (standardized):White
relationship to head of household (original):Head
relationship to head of household (standardized):Head
birthplace:Illinois
estimated birth year:1899
residence in 1935: Pekin, Illinois
enumeration district number:50-32A
family number:11
sheet number and letter:1B
line number:61
nara publication number:T627
nara roll number:3863
digital folder number:005462085
image number:00647
Household Gender Age Birthplace
head Roy Nelson M 41 Illinois
wife Gladys Nelson F 33 Minnesota
daughter Shirley Nelson F 11 Iowa
son Roy Nelson M 8 Iowa
son Richard Nelson M 6 Illinois
Source Citation:
“United States Census, 1940,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/V19Y-7XH : accessed 04 Aug 2012), Roy Nelson, Ward 3, Sioux Falls, Sioux Falls City, Minnehaha, South Dakota, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 50-32A, sheet 1B, family 11, NARA digital publication T627, roll 3863.

Gladys resided with her Father beginning in 1941 after her Mother died, and cared for him up until his death in 1968, at 705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa.

Great Aunt “Gladys” worked as a Proofreader for the Dubuque newspaper, the Dubuque Telegraph Herald until she retired.

Then she sold the Linderman homestead at 705 W. Third Street, Dubuque, Iowa, and moved to Huntington Beach, California to be near her sister, Evelyn “Eppie” (Linderman) Ayala, and brother-in-law, Arturo “Art” Ayala.
Gladys always remembered the nieces and nephews, and Great nieces and nephews on our birthdays. 

We could always count on getting a birthday card from her with some money in it. She couldn’t afford much, but we thought that a dime or a quarter was a lot of money, because back then in the 1960’s it was. It made me feel special–knowing that someone that I hardly knew–way off in Iowa, was thinking of me.

Great Aunt Glady resided with her son Roy “Jimmy” Leonard Nelson Jr., at 4045 Linkwood Drive, Houston, Harris County, Texas for the last few years of her life.

Cremated in Texas and son brought her ashes back to Iowa and spread around Mother, Gudrun (Lund) Linderman’s gravesite, in Linwood Cemetery, Dubuque, Iowa, because that is how she wanted it.